2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158325
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Condom Use Among African American Female Adolescents
Abstract:
Factors Influencing Condom Use Among African American Female Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Bralock, A.
P.I. Institution Name:PO Box 90184
Contact Address:, Los Angeles, CA, 90043, USA
Purpose/Aims: Many sexually active teenagers face risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections including HIV and AIDS. Half of all new AIDS cases are occurring in person's 25 years of age and younger. Inner-city minority adolescents, in particular, are at higher risk as a function of greater concentrations of HIV in inner-city areas. The purposes of this study were to examine factors influencing condom use behavior among African American female adolescents and to determine whether perceived self-efficacy, behavioral intentions and relationship power influence sexual risk-taking. The theory of reasoned action, social cognitive theory and the theory of gender and power were used as a framework for this study. Aim I: To gain an understanding about influences on condom use of African American female adolescents in relationships through semi-structured open-ended interviews. Aim II: To determine the influences of selected theoretical constructs, intervening variables and socio-demographic factors on condom use among African American female adolescents. Methods/Results: The study used both qualitative and quantitative strategies for the collection of data. A total of 130 young women ranging from 14 – 20 years of age completed written questionnaires in a clinic setting during a single data point. Additionally, open-ended interviews conducted with eleven adolescents allowed for the opportunity to gain an understanding of their perspectives on condom use in relationships. Findings of this study showed that behavioral intentions to use condoms were the strongest correlate of actual condom use among African American adolescents (r = .417, p < .001). Multiple regression analysis resulted in a model that accounted for 23% of the variance. Behavioral intentions, partner age and length of sexual relationship were statistically significant predictors, F (3, 121) = 11.87, p < .001. A negative or inverse relationship existed where the older the partner and the older the participant, the lower the relative frequency of condom use. The qualitative findings of this study suggest that adolescents desired the love of a man, and were willing to concede to his request of practicing unprotected sex. Adolescents reported high levels of power within their relationships nevertheless they may not have been able to negotiate the use of condoms with their partner during the actual episode of vaginal sex. The findings of this study suggest that many adolescents practice risky behaviors during sexual intercourse because of failure to use condoms or inconsistent condom use. These findings support the urgent need for interventions, which will promote skill-building techniques to negotiate safer sex behaviors among young women who are most likely to be exposed to sexually transmitted infections through risky behaviors. Educating and empowering mothers to promote abstinence and safer sex behaviors to their preteens is another important strategy. Interventions may have to be initiated before teens become sexually active. Finally, further research is needed to address issues related to relationship dynamics, including the potential effects that partner status and love have on sexual risk-taking behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Condom Use Among African American Female Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158325-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Influencing Condom Use Among African American Female Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bralock, A.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">PO Box 90184</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Los Angeles, CA, 90043, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: Many sexually active teenagers face risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections including HIV and AIDS. Half of all new AIDS cases are occurring in person's 25 years of age and younger. Inner-city minority adolescents, in particular, are at higher risk as a function of greater concentrations of HIV in inner-city areas. The purposes of this study were to examine factors influencing condom use behavior among African American female adolescents and to determine whether perceived self-efficacy, behavioral intentions and relationship power influence sexual risk-taking. The theory of reasoned action, social cognitive theory and the theory of gender and power were used as a framework for this study. Aim I: To gain an understanding about influences on condom use of African American female adolescents in relationships through semi-structured open-ended interviews. Aim II: To determine the influences of selected theoretical constructs, intervening variables and socio-demographic factors on condom use among African American female adolescents. Methods/Results: The study used both qualitative and quantitative strategies for the collection of data. A total of 130 young women ranging from 14 &ndash; 20 years of age completed written questionnaires in a clinic setting during a single data point. Additionally, open-ended interviews conducted with eleven adolescents allowed for the opportunity to gain an understanding of their perspectives on condom use in relationships. Findings of this study showed that behavioral intentions to use condoms were the strongest correlate of actual condom use among African American adolescents (r = .417, p &lt; .001). Multiple regression analysis resulted in a model that accounted for 23% of the variance. Behavioral intentions, partner age and length of sexual relationship were statistically significant predictors, F (3, 121) = 11.87, p &lt; .001. A negative or inverse relationship existed where the older the partner and the older the participant, the lower the relative frequency of condom use. The qualitative findings of this study suggest that adolescents desired the love of a man, and were willing to concede to his request of practicing unprotected sex. Adolescents reported high levels of power within their relationships nevertheless they may not have been able to negotiate the use of condoms with their partner during the actual episode of vaginal sex. The findings of this study suggest that many adolescents practice risky behaviors during sexual intercourse because of failure to use condoms or inconsistent condom use. These findings support the urgent need for interventions, which will promote skill-building techniques to negotiate safer sex behaviors among young women who are most likely to be exposed to sexually transmitted infections through risky behaviors. Educating and empowering mothers to promote abstinence and safer sex behaviors to their preteens is another important strategy. Interventions may have to be initiated before teens become sexually active. Finally, further research is needed to address issues related to relationship dynamics, including the potential effects that partner status and love have on sexual risk-taking behaviors. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:44:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:44:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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