Barriers to Addressing Patient Sexuality Concerns Across Nursing Areas of Specialization

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158333
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers to Addressing Patient Sexuality Concerns Across Nursing Areas of Specialization
Abstract:
Barriers to Addressing Patient Sexuality Concerns Across Nursing Areas of Specialization
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Magnan, Morris, PhD, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Oakland University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 448 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48341, USA
Research supports that nurses' attitudes and beliefs might act as barriers to addressing patient's sexuality concerns. However, it is not clear whether barriers are the same for nurses working in different specialty areas: medicine, surgery, oncology, rehabilitation, OB/GYN. Knowing what attitudes and beliefs might act as barriers in different specialty areas could help nurse educators tailor educational programs to the needs of clinicians. This study: (1) describes barriers to addressing patient sexuality across five areas of specialization, and (2) explores to what extent barriers differ across specialty areas. The Sexuality Attitudes and Beliefs Scale, an internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha = .75), 12-item instrument was used to assess nurses' (N = 380) perceptions of barriers to addressing patient sexuality. Survey results showed that rank ordering on the top five barriers to addressing patient sexuality differed across specialty areas, but the number one barrier across all specialties was that nurses do not believe that patients expect them to address their sexuality concerns. Mean SABS scores did not differ across specialty areas, but ANOVA with post hoc analyses revealed statistically significant differences (all ps < .05) on 7 of the 12 SABS items. Overall, findings suggests that barriers to addressing patient sexuality vary across specialty areas with the notable exception that nurses across specialty areas uniformly identified "patient expectation" as the number one barrier to addressing sexuality concerns. These findings have implications for both practice and research. In practice, nurse-patient interactions need to be based on validated information about patient expectations and concerns. Otherwise, patient sexuality concerns might never be disclosed or addressed. Research supports that patients are open to discussing sexuality concerns with nurses, but current research is needed to determine whether patients across specialty areas are uniformly open to discussing sexuality concerns and to identify factors that might influence patient openness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers to Addressing Patient Sexuality Concerns Across Nursing Areas of Specializationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158333-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Barriers to Addressing Patient Sexuality Concerns Across Nursing Areas of Specialization</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Magnan, Morris, PhD, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oakland University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 448 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48341, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research supports that nurses' attitudes and beliefs might act as barriers to addressing patient's sexuality concerns. However, it is not clear whether barriers are the same for nurses working in different specialty areas: medicine, surgery, oncology, rehabilitation, OB/GYN. Knowing what attitudes and beliefs might act as barriers in different specialty areas could help nurse educators tailor educational programs to the needs of clinicians. This study: (1) describes barriers to addressing patient sexuality across five areas of specialization, and (2) explores to what extent barriers differ across specialty areas. The Sexuality Attitudes and Beliefs Scale, an internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha = .75), 12-item instrument was used to assess nurses' (N = 380) perceptions of barriers to addressing patient sexuality. Survey results showed that rank ordering on the top five barriers to addressing patient sexuality differed across specialty areas, but the number one barrier across all specialties was that nurses do not believe that patients expect them to address their sexuality concerns. Mean SABS scores did not differ across specialty areas, but ANOVA with post hoc analyses revealed statistically significant differences (all ps &lt; .05) on 7 of the 12 SABS items. Overall, findings suggests that barriers to addressing patient sexuality vary across specialty areas with the notable exception that nurses across specialty areas uniformly identified &quot;patient expectation&quot; as the number one barrier to addressing sexuality concerns. These findings have implications for both practice and research. In practice, nurse-patient interactions need to be based on validated information about patient expectations and concerns. Otherwise, patient sexuality concerns might never be disclosed or addressed. Research supports that patients are open to discussing sexuality concerns with nurses, but current research is needed to determine whether patients across specialty areas are uniformly open to discussing sexuality concerns and to identify factors that might influence patient openness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:56:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:56:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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