Evaluation of a Primary Health Care Strategy to Address Diabetes Care Disparities in a U.S. Urban Latino Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158335
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of a Primary Health Care Strategy to Address Diabetes Care Disparities in a U.S. Urban Latino Population
Abstract:
Evaluation of a Primary Health Care Strategy to Address Diabetes Care Disparities in a U.S. Urban Latino Population
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:McCreary, Linda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA
Contact Telephone:312-355-3446
Co-Authors:Beverly J. McElmurry, EdD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean; Chang G. Park, PhD, Research Analyst; Leon Fogelfeld, MD, Department Head; Rajesh Parikh, MD, MPH, Executive Director; and Enrique Martinez, MD
Purpose: Language and cultural barriers to quality health care contribute to health disparities among Low English Proficient (LEP) Latino persons with diabetes in the U.S. Because Hispanics are underrepresented in the health professions, LEP Latinos often receive care from non-Hispanic providers who lack language and cultural skills to provide adequate care. The purpose of this evaluation study is to describe the development and outcomes of a multisectoral primary health care service demonstration program to reduce health disparities in low-English proficient (LEP) Latino diabetes patients treated in diabetes clinics of a large metropolitan health center. Theoretical/Conceptual framework: The Primary Health Care (PHC) approach promotes the health of communities through the development of community-based health programs that are accessible, acceptable, culturally appropriate, affordable, equitable, and sustainable. This program was developed on PHC principles to increase accessibility and provide culturally appropriate health care emphasizing prevention and the provision of essential health services. Subjects: A convenience sample of 386 health professionals and health professions students and 1,994 LEP Latino diabetes patients at a large metropolitan public health care center participated in the program over a 3-year period. Method: This descriptive study intervention targeted both patients and health care providers. Trained community health workers (Health Promoters - HPs) provided Spanish language diabetes education to LEP Latino patients. Health care professionals and health professions students attended intensive Spanish language training and cultural competency workshops. Results and Conclusions: Health professionals receiving language and cultural training reported improved interactions with patients and greater appreciation for cultural influences on health. Latino diabetes patients receiving HP services attended a greater number of clinic visits, had a lower "no show" rate, were more likely to perform self blood-glucose monitoring, and experienced a greater drop in hemoglobinA1c over time. Following PHC principles, the program increased access to acceptable, appropriate, and sustainable health care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of a Primary Health Care Strategy to Address Diabetes Care Disparities in a U.S. Urban Latino Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158335-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of a Primary Health Care Strategy to Address Diabetes Care Disparities in a U.S. Urban Latino Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCreary, Linda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-355-3446</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mccreary@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beverly J. McElmurry, EdD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean; Chang G. Park, PhD, Research Analyst; Leon Fogelfeld, MD, Department Head; Rajesh Parikh, MD, MPH, Executive Director; and Enrique Martinez, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Language and cultural barriers to quality health care contribute to health disparities among Low English Proficient (LEP) Latino persons with diabetes in the U.S. Because Hispanics are underrepresented in the health professions, LEP Latinos often receive care from non-Hispanic providers who lack language and cultural skills to provide adequate care. The purpose of this evaluation study is to describe the development and outcomes of a multisectoral primary health care service demonstration program to reduce health disparities in low-English proficient (LEP) Latino diabetes patients treated in diabetes clinics of a large metropolitan health center. Theoretical/Conceptual framework: The Primary Health Care (PHC) approach promotes the health of communities through the development of community-based health programs that are accessible, acceptable, culturally appropriate, affordable, equitable, and sustainable. This program was developed on PHC principles to increase accessibility and provide culturally appropriate health care emphasizing prevention and the provision of essential health services. Subjects: A convenience sample of 386 health professionals and health professions students and 1,994 LEP Latino diabetes patients at a large metropolitan public health care center participated in the program over a 3-year period. Method: This descriptive study intervention targeted both patients and health care providers. Trained community health workers (Health Promoters - HPs) provided Spanish language diabetes education to LEP Latino patients. Health care professionals and health professions students attended intensive Spanish language training and cultural competency workshops. Results and Conclusions: Health professionals receiving language and cultural training reported improved interactions with patients and greater appreciation for cultural influences on health. Latino diabetes patients receiving HP services attended a greater number of clinic visits, had a lower &quot;no show&quot; rate, were more likely to perform self blood-glucose monitoring, and experienced a greater drop in hemoglobinA1c over time. Following PHC principles, the program increased access to acceptable, appropriate, and sustainable health care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:56:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:56:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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