Causes and consequences of changes in Grandmother caregiver status over three years

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158337
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Causes and consequences of changes in Grandmother caregiver status over three years
Abstract:
Causes and consequences of changes in Grandmother caregiver status over three years
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Musil, Carol, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-4700
Co-Authors:Camille Warner, PhD, Project Director; Alexandra Jeanblanc, MA; Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RN, C, FAAN, Associate Dean; Theresa Standing, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; May L Wykle, RN, PhD, FAAN, Dean; and Ian Blevans
Purpose: There is limited understanding about the continuity of grandmothers' roles in families, especially their caregiving to grandchildren. Identifying patterns of caregiving stability and change may have important health implications for grandmothers and their families.

Framework: The Resiliency Model of Family Stress guided this examination of the causes and consequences of changes in grandmother caregiver status to grandchildren across 24 months.

Subjects: A sample of Ohio grandmothers (n=486) were grouped according to caregiving to grandchildren (grandmothers raising grandchildren, grandmothers in multi-generational homes, and grandmothers not residing with grandchildren).

Method: Grandmothers reported on their health and well-being in three mailed questionnaires one year apart. Of the 486 participants, 440 continued in year 2 and 426 continued through year 3. Sixty-five grandmothers reported changes in caregiving status between years 1 and 2, 47 reported changes between years 2 and 3, and 19 reported changes during both intervals.

Results: Grandmothers reporting changes in caregiver status, regardless of direction, had higher initial and ongoing depressive symptoms than grandmothers whose caregiving status was stable. The most frequent change, from a caregiver to a non-caregiver role, was associated with a decrease in intra-family strain, although their strain levels were initially higher than other study grandmothers. Grandmothers who became multigenerational householders usually did so in response to stressful life events of their adult children (e.g., work demands, marital status changes or physical/mental health problems), and not due to their own health problems. Even among those whose ôcaregiving statusö remained stable, many grandmothers report family members transitioning in and out of her home between data points.

Conclusions: These visible and invisible change in caregiving responsibilities may substantially impact the grandmothers' lives, as well as those of their families. The specific health and social consequences of these changes are indeed complex and need continued attention from clinicians and researchers. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCauses and consequences of changes in Grandmother caregiver status over three yearsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158337-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Causes and consequences of changes in Grandmother caregiver status over three years</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Musil, Carol, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-4700</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmm4@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Camille Warner, PhD, Project Director; Alexandra Jeanblanc, MA; Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RN, C, FAAN, Associate Dean; Theresa Standing, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; May L Wykle, RN, PhD, FAAN, Dean; and Ian Blevans</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: There is limited understanding about the continuity of grandmothers' roles in families, especially their caregiving to grandchildren. Identifying patterns of caregiving stability and change may have important health implications for grandmothers and their families. <br/><br/>Framework: The Resiliency Model of Family Stress guided this examination of the causes and consequences of changes in grandmother caregiver status to grandchildren across 24 months.<br/><br/>Subjects: A sample of Ohio grandmothers (n=486) were grouped according to caregiving to grandchildren (grandmothers raising grandchildren, grandmothers in multi-generational homes, and grandmothers not residing with grandchildren). <br/><br/>Method: Grandmothers reported on their health and well-being in three mailed questionnaires one year apart. Of the 486 participants, 440 continued in year 2 and 426 continued through year 3. Sixty-five grandmothers reported changes in caregiving status between years 1 and 2, 47 reported changes between years 2 and 3, and 19 reported changes during both intervals. <br/><br/>Results: Grandmothers reporting changes in caregiver status, regardless of direction, had higher initial and ongoing depressive symptoms than grandmothers whose caregiving status was stable. The most frequent change, from a caregiver to a non-caregiver role, was associated with a decrease in intra-family strain, although their strain levels were initially higher than other study grandmothers. Grandmothers who became multigenerational householders usually did so in response to stressful life events of their adult children (e.g., work demands, marital status changes or physical/mental health problems), and not due to their own health problems. Even among those whose &ocirc;caregiving status&ouml; remained stable, many grandmothers report family members transitioning in and out of her home between data points. <br/><br/>Conclusions: These visible and invisible change in caregiving responsibilities may substantially impact the grandmothers' lives, as well as those of their families. The specific health and social consequences of these changes are indeed complex and need continued attention from clinicians and researchers. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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