2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158339
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Dysphoric Symptoms in Women with Diabetes
Abstract:
Exploring Dysphoric Symptoms in Women with Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Penckofer, Sue, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Associate Dean for Research
Contact Address:Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 2160 S. First Ave., Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Contact Telephone:(708)216-9303
Co-Authors:Carol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Faculty
Women with diabetes are six times more likely to develop coronary heart disease than women without diabetes. African Americans are twice as likely to have diabetes and have a mortality that is 40% higher than whites. Dsyphoric symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and anger are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. These emotions can negatively affect self-management, glycemic control, and cardiovascular risk. The aims of the study were to examine: (1) the feelings of depression, anxiety, and anger experienced by women with type 2 diabetes, (2) the impact these feelings have on the management of their diabetes, health, and quality of life, and (3) whether there are differences between African American and white responses. Four focus groups (2 white, 2 African American) were conducted by culturally-sensitive, professional moderators using an interview guide. Forty one women, mean age 56 (SD=7.9), who had type 2 diabetes for an average of 8.5 years (SD=6.3) participated. An inductive approach is being used for content analysis of the responses. Preliminary findings are that women reported having depression, anxiety, and anger on a regular basis. Being overweight, having diabetes, and not being able to do what they used to; generated feelings of sadness or depression. Women were anxious about the complications of diabetes such as possible dialysis, blindness, and being dependent on others. They also expressed anger which focused on themselves as well as others. Methods of coping were similar across the emotions and included: eating, sleeping, and praying. Some reported taking a "diabetic break" or "diabetic holiday" to feel better. Women believed that their emotions impacted their quality of life, particularly their relationship with others and their self-management. Findings from this study will be used to develop a psychoeducational program to promote emotional well being in women with type 2 diabetes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Dysphoric Symptoms in Women with Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158339-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring Dysphoric Symptoms in Women with Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Penckofer, Sue, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 2160 S. First Ave., Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(708)216-9303</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">spencko@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Faculty</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Women with diabetes are six times more likely to develop coronary heart disease than women without diabetes. African Americans are twice as likely to have diabetes and have a mortality that is 40% higher than whites. Dsyphoric symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and anger are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. These emotions can negatively affect self-management, glycemic control, and cardiovascular risk. The aims of the study were to examine: (1) the feelings of depression, anxiety, and anger experienced by women with type 2 diabetes, (2) the impact these feelings have on the management of their diabetes, health, and quality of life, and (3) whether there are differences between African American and white responses. Four focus groups (2 white, 2 African American) were conducted by culturally-sensitive, professional moderators using an interview guide. Forty one women, mean age 56 (SD=7.9), who had type 2 diabetes for an average of 8.5 years (SD=6.3) participated. An inductive approach is being used for content analysis of the responses. Preliminary findings are that women reported having depression, anxiety, and anger on a regular basis. Being overweight, having diabetes, and not being able to do what they used to; generated feelings of sadness or depression. Women were anxious about the complications of diabetes such as possible dialysis, blindness, and being dependent on others. They also expressed anger which focused on themselves as well as others. Methods of coping were similar across the emotions and included: eating, sleeping, and praying. Some reported taking a &quot;diabetic break&quot; or &quot;diabetic holiday&quot; to feel better. Women believed that their emotions impacted their quality of life, particularly their relationship with others and their self-management. Findings from this study will be used to develop a psychoeducational program to promote emotional well being in women with type 2 diabetes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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