2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158341
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Increasing Physical Activity in an Academic Work Environment: Focus Group Results
Abstract:
Increasing Physical Activity in an Academic Work Environment: Focus Group Results
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Prosser, Rachel, MS, NP, C, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:Health Promotion, 2930 Signature Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI, 48103, USA
Contact Telephone:734-332-1675
Co-Authors:Anne Thomas, PhD, APRN, BC, ANP, Assistant Professor and Cindy Darling-Fisher, PhD, APRN, BC, FNP, Assistant Professor
SIGNIFICANCE: Regular physical activity provides significant health benefits for people of all ages. Despite extensive community interventions that encourage physical activity, more than 60% of Americans do not engage in regular physical activity (USDHHS, 2000). A behavioral lifestyle intervention delivered in a worksite setting is an effective strategy for adults who may not regularly participate in physical activity (PA) within or outside of the work environment. There have been relatively few worksite interventions designed to increase PA, specifically in an academic setting. AIMS AND METHODS: This research project was the first phase of a three phase pilot study to investigate a worksite intervention to promote PA in a Midwestern School of Nursing. The aim was to use focus groups to ascertain motivations, intentions, behaviors and attitudes of PA as related to worksite PA. The Theory of Planned Behavior was used to design focus group questions. All faculty and staff in the School of Nursing were invited to participate. Three focus groups lasting approximately one and + hours each were conducted with a total of 19 faculty and staff participating. RESULTS: The data analysis revealed focus group members believed increasing PA would be good if it did not interfere with work or supervisors' needs, highlighted the imperativeness of administrative support, and having walking buddies or groups would facilitate increasing physical activity at work. Any intervention that was offered would need to be low cost or free. Data also revealed that a flexible schedule for the PA intervention and incorporating the activity into the usual workday would facilitate engaging in a sustained behavioral change. These findings were then incorporated into the key constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior to create physical activity interventions in Phase 2 and 3 of the pilot project.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncreasing Physical Activity in an Academic Work Environment: Focus Group Resultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158341-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Increasing Physical Activity in an Academic Work Environment: Focus Group Results</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Prosser, Rachel, MS, NP, C, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Health Promotion, 2930 Signature Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI, 48103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-332-1675</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rprosser@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anne Thomas, PhD, APRN, BC, ANP, Assistant Professor and Cindy Darling-Fisher, PhD, APRN, BC, FNP, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">SIGNIFICANCE: Regular physical activity provides significant health benefits for people of all ages. Despite extensive community interventions that encourage physical activity, more than 60% of Americans do not engage in regular physical activity (USDHHS, 2000). A behavioral lifestyle intervention delivered in a worksite setting is an effective strategy for adults who may not regularly participate in physical activity (PA) within or outside of the work environment. There have been relatively few worksite interventions designed to increase PA, specifically in an academic setting. AIMS AND METHODS: This research project was the first phase of a three phase pilot study to investigate a worksite intervention to promote PA in a Midwestern School of Nursing. The aim was to use focus groups to ascertain motivations, intentions, behaviors and attitudes of PA as related to worksite PA. The Theory of Planned Behavior was used to design focus group questions. All faculty and staff in the School of Nursing were invited to participate. Three focus groups lasting approximately one and + hours each were conducted with a total of 19 faculty and staff participating. RESULTS: The data analysis revealed focus group members believed increasing PA would be good if it did not interfere with work or supervisors' needs, highlighted the imperativeness of administrative support, and having walking buddies or groups would facilitate increasing physical activity at work. Any intervention that was offered would need to be low cost or free. Data also revealed that a flexible schedule for the PA intervention and incorporating the activity into the usual workday would facilitate engaging in a sustained behavioral change. These findings were then incorporated into the key constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior to create physical activity interventions in Phase 2 and 3 of the pilot project.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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