Comparison of commonly used sites of placement and mode of measurement for activity monitors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158342
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of commonly used sites of placement and mode of measurement for activity monitors
Abstract:
Comparison of commonly used sites of placement and mode of measurement for activity monitors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Rapp, Mary Pat, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center Houston
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing - Office 7.748, 6901 Bertner Blvd, Houston, TX, 77030, USA
Contact Telephone:713 500 2133
Co-Authors:Nancy Bergstrom, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor and Francine Nelson, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
Purpose: Is there a significant difference in movement of immobile nursing facility residents when measured by placing actigraphs at the waist, wrist, or ankle? Conceptual Framework: The conceptual schema for pressure sore risk illustrates the relationship between the amount and duration of external pressure and pressure ulcer development. A surrogate measure for the amount and duration of pressure is movement. Measured by actigraphy, movement is detected in three modes; zero crossing (ZCM) for frequency, time above threshold (TAT) for duration, or proportional integrated (PIM) for intensity. Subjects: Sixteen residents 72 û 93 years old, primarily female (14), and White (15), with Braden Scale scores 8 - 19 participated. Methods: Actigraphs (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY) worn for 72 hours at three sites; the non-dominant wrist, ankle, and waist recorded activity. Data were analyzed using Action-W 2.4 software and SPSS 13.0 statistical package. Results: Within subjects, ANOVA shows no significant difference in means by site for means of: acceleration index F(2, 128) = 2.66, p = .07, activity standard deviation F(2, 128) = .49, p = .62, and mode for acceleration index F(2, 128) = .001, p = .99. Kruskal-Wallis shows a significant difference in means by mode for means of: activity c2(2, N = 129) = 82.33, p < .01, activity median c2(2, N = 129) = 42.65, p < .01, and activity standard deviation c2(2, N = 129) = 88.97, p < .01. Conclusions: There is no significant difference in movement when measured simultaneously at three sites using actigraphy. As expected, the three modes measure different parameters of movement (frequency, duration, and intensity), and are not equivalent. The data suggest that investigators can utilize the wrist, waist, or ankle to measure movement by actigraphy. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of commonly used sites of placement and mode of measurement for activity monitorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158342-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of commonly used sites of placement and mode of measurement for activity monitors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rapp, Mary Pat, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center Houston</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing - Office 7.748, 6901 Bertner Blvd, Houston, TX, 77030, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">713 500 2133</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.p.rapp@uth.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Bergstrom, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor and Francine Nelson, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Is there a significant difference in movement of immobile nursing facility residents when measured by placing actigraphs at the waist, wrist, or ankle? Conceptual Framework: The conceptual schema for pressure sore risk illustrates the relationship between the amount and duration of external pressure and pressure ulcer development. A surrogate measure for the amount and duration of pressure is movement. Measured by actigraphy, movement is detected in three modes; zero crossing (ZCM) for frequency, time above threshold (TAT) for duration, or proportional integrated (PIM) for intensity. Subjects: Sixteen residents 72 &ucirc; 93 years old, primarily female (14), and White (15), with Braden Scale scores 8 - 19 participated. Methods: Actigraphs (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY) worn for 72 hours at three sites; the non-dominant wrist, ankle, and waist recorded activity. Data were analyzed using Action-W 2.4 software and SPSS 13.0 statistical package. Results: Within subjects, ANOVA shows no significant difference in means by site for means of: acceleration index F(2, 128) = 2.66, p = .07, activity standard deviation F(2, 128) = .49, p = .62, and mode for acceleration index F(2, 128) = .001, p = .99. Kruskal-Wallis shows a significant difference in means by mode for means of: activity c2(2, N = 129) = 82.33, p &lt; .01, activity median c2(2, N = 129) = 42.65, p &lt; .01, and activity standard deviation c2(2, N = 129) = 88.97, p &lt; .01. Conclusions: There is no significant difference in movement when measured simultaneously at three sites using actigraphy. As expected, the three modes measure different parameters of movement (frequency, duration, and intensity), and are not equivalent. The data suggest that investigators can utilize the wrist, waist, or ankle to measure movement by actigraphy. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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