2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158344
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Shared Care on Family Care
Abstract:
Effects of Shared Care on Family Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sebern, Margaret, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Dept. - Cunningham Room 421, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414-229-3169
Purpose: A tremendous amount of health care is delegated to patient-caregiver dyads. Family care involves complex interactions that can be stressful, with positive and negative outcomes. Family care is important to nurses because family participation in care is necessary to achieve optimal outcomes from nursing interventions. In prior work we discovered three factors were associated with a breakdown of family care: communication, decision making, reciprocity. We called these factors Shared Care, and developed the Shared Care Instrument-3 (SCI-3) to measure Shared Care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Shared Care on patient and caregiver strain and depressive symptoms. Framework: The theoretical basis on this study is the construct, Shared Care, and the social support framework, specifically the effects of social relationships on health. Subjects: Participants in this study were home health patients and caregivers who were: over 18 years old, living together, cognition and vision intact. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used. Survey packages were mailed to 579 randomly selected home health family dyads. Each survey package included the SCI-3, CES-D, Dyad Strain Scale, demographic and functional status measures, written instructions, and a stamped return envelope. The response rate was 42% for caregivers (n=246) and 45% for patients (n=260). Results: LISREL was used to test both a patient and caregiver theoretical model with 191 matched cases. The data supported both models. Shared Care components varied significantly with strain, and Shared Care and strain varied significantly with depressive symptoms. For example, a unit increase in caregiver reciprocity resulted in a .42 decrease in strain. The caregiver model explained 44% of caregiver, and 43% of patient depressive symptoms. Implications for nursing are; nurses can use Shared Care to assess for difficulties in family care, design interventions to assist in areas of difficulty, and improve outcomes for both.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Shared Care on Family Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158344-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Shared Care on Family Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sebern, Margaret, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Dept. - Cunningham Room 421, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-229-3169</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marge@sebern.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: A tremendous amount of health care is delegated to patient-caregiver dyads. Family care involves complex interactions that can be stressful, with positive and negative outcomes. Family care is important to nurses because family participation in care is necessary to achieve optimal outcomes from nursing interventions. In prior work we discovered three factors were associated with a breakdown of family care: communication, decision making, reciprocity. We called these factors Shared Care, and developed the Shared Care Instrument-3 (SCI-3) to measure Shared Care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Shared Care on patient and caregiver strain and depressive symptoms. Framework: The theoretical basis on this study is the construct, Shared Care, and the social support framework, specifically the effects of social relationships on health. Subjects: Participants in this study were home health patients and caregivers who were: over 18 years old, living together, cognition and vision intact. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used. Survey packages were mailed to 579 randomly selected home health family dyads. Each survey package included the SCI-3, CES-D, Dyad Strain Scale, demographic and functional status measures, written instructions, and a stamped return envelope. The response rate was 42% for caregivers (n=246) and 45% for patients (n=260). Results: LISREL was used to test both a patient and caregiver theoretical model with 191 matched cases. The data supported both models. Shared Care components varied significantly with strain, and Shared Care and strain varied significantly with depressive symptoms. For example, a unit increase in caregiver reciprocity resulted in a .42 decrease in strain. The caregiver model explained 44% of caregiver, and 43% of patient depressive symptoms. Implications for nursing are; nurses can use Shared Care to assess for difficulties in family care, design interventions to assist in areas of difficulty, and improve outcomes for both.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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