ôHe Won't Use Condomsö: HIV-Infected Women's Struggles In Serodiscordant Primary Partnerships

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158345
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ôHe Won't Use Condomsö: HIV-Infected Women's Struggles In Serodiscordant Primary Partnerships
Abstract:
ôHe Won't Use Condomsö: HIV-Infected Women's Struggles In Serodiscordant Primary Partnerships
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Stevens, Patricia, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414-229-5817
In this longitudinal qualitative study, using a feminist narrative approach, we investigated the sexual behaviors of a multi-racial, relatively low-income sample of 55 HIV-infected women who narrated their lives in ten interviews over two years. Findings provide experiential detail and narrative depth to an understanding of the interpersonal situations in which sexual risk occurs for women living with HIV. During the prospective period, 58% were sexually abstinent and 24% practiced safe sex exclusively. The remaining 18% engaged in unprotected sex, but only in the context of primary partnerships, almost all of which were serodiscordant. In these relationships, women made painstaking attempts to initiate condom use. Unprotected sex occurred at the overpowering insistence of male partners. Consequently, women lived in trepidation of causing their partners' sickness and death. The common trajectory of events in these narratives of sexual risk started with women talking repeatedly to their partners about safe sex. Over time, the talking degraded into arguments. Arguments degraded into episodes of unprotected sex. Multiple episodes of unprotected sex degraded into an uncontested pattern of sexual risk. Women tried to make sense of their HIV-negative partners' unwillingness to use condoms, interpreting it as love for them, denial of risk, God's will, desire for sexual pleasure, or need for control. Nonetheless, they were trapped by worry and guilt. Health care providers were absent in their stories, except as occasional bit players called upon to coerce condom use, albeit unsuccessfully. According to the CDC, secondary prevention of HIV targeted to those who are already infected should be an integral part of the primary care delivered by nurses and physicians. Recommendations for intervening more effectively with HIV-infected women, their male primary partners, and serodiscordant couples will be offered. Funding: NIH RO1 NR04840, National Institute of Nursing Research and National Institute of Drug Abuse
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleôHe Won't Use Condomsö: HIV-Infected Women's Struggles In Serodiscordant Primary Partnershipsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158345-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">&ocirc;He Won't Use Condoms&ouml;: HIV-Infected Women's Struggles In Serodiscordant Primary Partnerships</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stevens, Patricia, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-229-5817</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pstevens@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In this longitudinal qualitative study, using a feminist narrative approach, we investigated the sexual behaviors of a multi-racial, relatively low-income sample of 55 HIV-infected women who narrated their lives in ten interviews over two years. Findings provide experiential detail and narrative depth to an understanding of the interpersonal situations in which sexual risk occurs for women living with HIV. During the prospective period, 58% were sexually abstinent and 24% practiced safe sex exclusively. The remaining 18% engaged in unprotected sex, but only in the context of primary partnerships, almost all of which were serodiscordant. In these relationships, women made painstaking attempts to initiate condom use. Unprotected sex occurred at the overpowering insistence of male partners. Consequently, women lived in trepidation of causing their partners' sickness and death. The common trajectory of events in these narratives of sexual risk started with women talking repeatedly to their partners about safe sex. Over time, the talking degraded into arguments. Arguments degraded into episodes of unprotected sex. Multiple episodes of unprotected sex degraded into an uncontested pattern of sexual risk. Women tried to make sense of their HIV-negative partners' unwillingness to use condoms, interpreting it as love for them, denial of risk, God's will, desire for sexual pleasure, or need for control. Nonetheless, they were trapped by worry and guilt. Health care providers were absent in their stories, except as occasional bit players called upon to coerce condom use, albeit unsuccessfully. According to the CDC, secondary prevention of HIV targeted to those who are already infected should be an integral part of the primary care delivered by nurses and physicians. Recommendations for intervening more effectively with HIV-infected women, their male primary partners, and serodiscordant couples will be offered. Funding: NIH RO1 NR04840, National Institute of Nursing Research and National Institute of Drug Abuse</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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