2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158346
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complications in Hospitalized Older Adults
Abstract:
Complications in Hospitalized Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Titler, Marita, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, T-100 General Hospital, 200 Hawkins Dr., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-353-6995
Co-Authors:Joanne Dochterman, PhD, RN, FAAN; Debra Picone, PhD, RN; Leah L Shever, BSN, RN; Project Director; Rui Qin, MS and Taikyoung Kim, MS
Purpose: The purpose was to investigate the factors influencing complications of acute care services for older adults hospitalized for a fractured hip or hip procedure.

Conceptual Framework: Derived from Kane's work (1997), patient outcomes of acute care services are influenced by the characteristics of the patient, their clinical condition, the treatments they receive, and the context in which care is delivered.

Subjects: 497 adults ? 60 years of age hospitalized in an 850 bed academic medical center in the Midwest, from 7/1/98 to 6/31/2002. The majority of subjects were Caucasian, female, and over 70 years of age.

Methods: Patients meeting the inclusion criteria were extracted from the nursing outcomes effectiveness database, developed from 9 clinical and operational data repositories from an acute care tertiary hospital in the Midwest. In the case of multiple complications during a hospitalization, the first complication was defined as the study endpoint, with predictor variables being those that occurred prior to the complication. 115 variables were examined using GEE analyses. Data reduction within each conceptual area (e.g. patient characteristics) resulted in 28 variables being entered in the final model with 11 being retained.

Results: 21% of the hospitalizations had a complication. Predictors of having a complication included skill mix; RN staff hours per patient day; polypharmacy; number of unique nursing treatments; and the nursing treatments of Bathing; Pressure Ulcer Care; Pain Management; Blood Product Administration; Exercise Therapy; and Wound Care. Those who received these types of nursing treatments were less likely to have a complication. As the number of unique nursing treatments increased, however, the odds of having a complication increased (OR=1.45), possible reflecting increasing complexity of care.

Conclusions: Using standardized nursing language helps explicate those nursing treatments associated with fewer complications, and thereby facilitates patient safety.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplications in Hospitalized Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158346-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Complications in Hospitalized Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Titler, Marita, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, T-100 General Hospital, 200 Hawkins Dr., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-353-6995</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marita-titler@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joanne Dochterman, PhD, RN, FAAN; Debra Picone, PhD, RN; Leah L Shever, BSN, RN; Project Director; Rui Qin, MS and Taikyoung Kim, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose was to investigate the factors influencing complications of acute care services for older adults hospitalized for a fractured hip or hip procedure. <br/><br/>Conceptual Framework: Derived from Kane's work (1997), patient outcomes of acute care services are influenced by the characteristics of the patient, their clinical condition, the treatments they receive, and the context in which care is delivered. <br/><br/>Subjects: 497 adults ? 60 years of age hospitalized in an 850 bed academic medical center in the Midwest, from 7/1/98 to 6/31/2002. The majority of subjects were Caucasian, female, and over 70 years of age.<br/><br/>Methods: Patients meeting the inclusion criteria were extracted from the nursing outcomes effectiveness database, developed from 9 clinical and operational data repositories from an acute care tertiary hospital in the Midwest. In the case of multiple complications during a hospitalization, the first complication was defined as the study endpoint, with predictor variables being those that occurred prior to the complication. 115 variables were examined using GEE analyses. Data reduction within each conceptual area (e.g. patient characteristics) resulted in 28 variables being entered in the final model with 11 being retained. <br/><br/>Results: 21% of the hospitalizations had a complication. Predictors of having a complication included skill mix; RN staff hours per patient day; polypharmacy; number of unique nursing treatments; and the nursing treatments of Bathing; Pressure Ulcer Care; Pain Management; Blood Product Administration; Exercise Therapy; and Wound Care. Those who received these types of nursing treatments were less likely to have a complication. As the number of unique nursing treatments increased, however, the odds of having a complication increased (OR=1.45), possible reflecting increasing complexity of care. <br/><br/>Conclusions: Using standardized nursing language helps explicate those nursing treatments associated with fewer complications, and thereby facilitates patient safety.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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