Preoperative Strength Pain and Perceived Functioning as Predictors of Postoperative Objective Functioning After Total Knee Arthroplasty

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158347
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preoperative Strength Pain and Perceived Functioning as Predictors of Postoperative Objective Functioning After Total Knee Arthroplasty
Abstract:
Preoperative Strength Pain and Perceived Functioning as Predictors of Postoperative Objective Functioning After Total Knee Arthroplasty
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Topp, Robert, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
Title:Associate Dean for Research
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 555 S. Floyd St, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA
Contact Telephone:(502) 852-8510
Co-Authors:Karen Frost, PhD, Post Doctoral Fellow; John Nyland, PhD; Peter Quesada, PhD; Ann Marie Swank, PhD, and Arthur Malkani, MD
The purpose of this study was to predict objective postoperative functioning from preoperative strength, perceived functioning and pain among total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients. The theoretical framework of prehabilitation predicts that post-operative functioning is dependent on the patient's preoperative strength and pain. Twenty-four adults scheduled for a TKA were evaluated during the week prior to their surgery and one month post-operatively for strength, functioning and pain. Knee flexion and extension strength was assessed in both the operated and nonoperated knee. Pain was evaluated using the WOMAC pain subscale. Perceived functioning was measured using the WOMAC functioning subscale. Objective functioning included the distance covered during a six minute walk or average gait speed during the six minute walk, the number of chair rises performed in 30 seconds and the duration of time required to ascend and descend a flight of stairs.

Postoperative walking distance or gait speed was predicted by higher preoperative knee extension strength on the operative side and greater perceived preoperative functioning (total R2 = .41, p<.001). Postoperative chair rises were predicted by higher preoperative knee flexion strength on the operative side and lower preoperative perceived pain (total R2 = .39, p<.001). Time to ascend stairs at the postoperative data collection was predicted by higher perceived pain and lower knee extension strength in the nonoperated knee (total R2 = .30, p<.001). Similarly, higher perceived pain and lower knee extension strength in the nonoperated knee predicted time to descend stairs (total R2 = .35, p<.001).

These findings support the theoretical framework of prehabilitation indicating greater preoperative knee strength, perceived functioning and lower pain predicts higher levels of postoperative functioning among TKA patients. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreoperative Strength Pain and Perceived Functioning as Predictors of Postoperative Objective Functioning After Total Knee Arthroplastyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158347-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preoperative Strength Pain and Perceived Functioning as Predictors of Postoperative Objective Functioning After Total Knee Arthroplasty</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Topp, Robert, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 555 S. Floyd St, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(502) 852-8510</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">RVTOPP01@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Frost, PhD, Post Doctoral Fellow; John Nyland, PhD; Peter Quesada, PhD; Ann Marie Swank, PhD, and Arthur Malkani, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to predict objective postoperative functioning from preoperative strength, perceived functioning and pain among total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients. The theoretical framework of prehabilitation predicts that post-operative functioning is dependent on the patient's preoperative strength and pain. Twenty-four adults scheduled for a TKA were evaluated during the week prior to their surgery and one month post-operatively for strength, functioning and pain. Knee flexion and extension strength was assessed in both the operated and nonoperated knee. Pain was evaluated using the WOMAC pain subscale. Perceived functioning was measured using the WOMAC functioning subscale. Objective functioning included the distance covered during a six minute walk or average gait speed during the six minute walk, the number of chair rises performed in 30 seconds and the duration of time required to ascend and descend a flight of stairs. <br/><br/>Postoperative walking distance or gait speed was predicted by higher preoperative knee extension strength on the operative side and greater perceived preoperative functioning (total R2 = .41, p&lt;.001). Postoperative chair rises were predicted by higher preoperative knee flexion strength on the operative side and lower preoperative perceived pain (total R2 = .39, p&lt;.001). Time to ascend stairs at the postoperative data collection was predicted by higher perceived pain and lower knee extension strength in the nonoperated knee (total R2 = .30, p&lt;.001). Similarly, higher perceived pain and lower knee extension strength in the nonoperated knee predicted time to descend stairs (total R2 = .35, p&lt;.001). <br/><br/>These findings support the theoretical framework of prehabilitation indicating greater preoperative knee strength, perceived functioning and lower pain predicts higher levels of postoperative functioning among TKA patients. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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