A Prospective Pre-Post Comparison of Physiologic and Psychologic Variables in Childbearing-Aged Women Experiencing Hypnosis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158348
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Prospective Pre-Post Comparison of Physiologic and Psychologic Variables in Childbearing-Aged Women Experiencing Hypnosis
Abstract:
A Prospective Pre-Post Comparison of Physiologic and Psychologic Variables in Childbearing-Aged Women Experiencing Hypnosis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:VandeVusse, Leona, PhD, CNM, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing - Clark Hall, P. O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA
Contact Telephone:414-288-3842
Co-Authors:Margaret A. Berner, MSN, CNM, RN, Instructor and Jill M. Winters, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Purpose: Hypnosis is an innovative, low technology, self-modulated approach for pain, anxiety, and stress reduction. This prospective pilot study examines physiologic and psychologic effects of hypnosis in women. It is hypothesized that heart rate, respiratory rate, and anxiety will be reduced and high frequency heart rate variability (HRV) measures will be increased after the hypnotic experience. An attempt will be made to evaluate the impact of menstrual cycle phase on autonomic nervous system responses to stress and relaxation. Conceptual Framework: This study is guided by Selye's theory of stress in disease and health and physiologic theory. Subjects: A convenience sample of 20 healthy, childbearing aged, non-pregnant female volunteers will be enrolled. Method: In this quasi-experimental, within subject repeated measures design study, women will serve as their own controls. Heart and respiratory rates and behavioral observations will be recorded at 10-minute intervals while each subject sits comfortably in a recliner and listens to a 30-minute recording of hypnotic suggestions. Continuously recorded electrocardiograph data will be collected and analyzed, using power spectral analysis, to quantify HRV. This method provides valid, noninvasive measures of autonomic nervous system activity. Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory will be administered initially and the Profile of Mood States before and after the hypnotic recording. Repeated measures ANOVA will be used to examine within subject changes in psychologic and physiologic measures before, during, and after the hypnotic experience. If adequate numbers are present, comparisons will be made across subjects with respect to menstrual cycle phases and medication use. Narrative data about the hypnotic experience will be analyzed using qualitative methods. Results and Conclusions: Findings will be available at the time of the conference. Acknowledgement: This study is funded in part by a Marquette University Regular Research Grant. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Prospective Pre-Post Comparison of Physiologic and Psychologic Variables in Childbearing-Aged Women Experiencing Hypnosisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158348-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Prospective Pre-Post Comparison of Physiologic and Psychologic Variables in Childbearing-Aged Women Experiencing Hypnosis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">VandeVusse, Leona, PhD, CNM, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing - Clark Hall, P. O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-288-3842</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leona.vandevusse@mu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret A. Berner, MSN, CNM, RN, Instructor and Jill M. Winters, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Hypnosis is an innovative, low technology, self-modulated approach for pain, anxiety, and stress reduction. This prospective pilot study examines physiologic and psychologic effects of hypnosis in women. It is hypothesized that heart rate, respiratory rate, and anxiety will be reduced and high frequency heart rate variability (HRV) measures will be increased after the hypnotic experience. An attempt will be made to evaluate the impact of menstrual cycle phase on autonomic nervous system responses to stress and relaxation. Conceptual Framework: This study is guided by Selye's theory of stress in disease and health and physiologic theory. Subjects: A convenience sample of 20 healthy, childbearing aged, non-pregnant female volunteers will be enrolled. Method: In this quasi-experimental, within subject repeated measures design study, women will serve as their own controls. Heart and respiratory rates and behavioral observations will be recorded at 10-minute intervals while each subject sits comfortably in a recliner and listens to a 30-minute recording of hypnotic suggestions. Continuously recorded electrocardiograph data will be collected and analyzed, using power spectral analysis, to quantify HRV. This method provides valid, noninvasive measures of autonomic nervous system activity. Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory will be administered initially and the Profile of Mood States before and after the hypnotic recording. Repeated measures ANOVA will be used to examine within subject changes in psychologic and physiologic measures before, during, and after the hypnotic experience. If adequate numbers are present, comparisons will be made across subjects with respect to menstrual cycle phases and medication use. Narrative data about the hypnotic experience will be analyzed using qualitative methods. Results and Conclusions: Findings will be available at the time of the conference. Acknowledgement: This study is funded in part by a Marquette University Regular Research Grant. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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