2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158350
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Interventions for Dignified Dying
Abstract:
Nursing Interventions for Dignified Dying
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Wilson, Sarah, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414-288-3860
Co-Authors:Ardith Doorenbos, PhD, RN, Post Doctoral Fellow and Amy Coenen, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor
Purpose: This study was part of a larger study for the International Classification of Nursing Practice (ICNP) to validate the concept of dignified dying. The purpose of this descriptive study was to describe nursing interventions for dignified dying. Conceptual model: Dignity is an inherent characteristic of being human. The Dignity Conserving Model of Care suggests that dignity at the end of life has three components: illness related concerns; dignity conserving repertories; and social dignity inventory. Subjects: A convenience sample of nurses who cared for dying patients in the U. S. (n = 281), India (n= 229), and Northeast Africa (n=50). Methods: A survey method was used and was completed in English or Hindi. The ICNP Dignified Dying Survey consisted of 14 items ranking characteristics of dignified dying, demographic data, and an opened ended question for interventions to promote dignified dying. Thematic analysis was used to identify major themes and categories of interventions based on the conceptual model. Results: Nursing interventions to promote physical comfort included maintaining hygiene and cleanliness and using analgesics to relieve pain. Dignity conserving repertories focused on communication and spiritual comfort. Listening was the most frequent intervention listed by U.S. nurses. Spiritual care was the most important intervention mentioned by Indian nurses. Praying with the patient and the use of Hindu rituals were frequently mentioned. Social dignity inventory interventions focused on including the family in care, providing privacy and support. Interventions to promote social dignity included creating a homelike environment and reducing noise. Conclusions: Nurses described interventions to promote dignified dying beyond the management of physical symptoms. Results of this study will contribute to the ongoing development of the ICNP and nursing interventions to improve and promote dignified dying.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Interventions for Dignified Dyingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158350-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Interventions for Dignified Dying</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilson, Sarah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-288-3860</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sarah.wilson@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ardith Doorenbos, PhD, RN, Post Doctoral Fellow and Amy Coenen, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study was part of a larger study for the International Classification of Nursing Practice (ICNP) to validate the concept of dignified dying. The purpose of this descriptive study was to describe nursing interventions for dignified dying. Conceptual model: Dignity is an inherent characteristic of being human. The Dignity Conserving Model of Care suggests that dignity at the end of life has three components: illness related concerns; dignity conserving repertories; and social dignity inventory. Subjects: A convenience sample of nurses who cared for dying patients in the U. S. (n = 281), India (n= 229), and Northeast Africa (n=50). Methods: A survey method was used and was completed in English or Hindi. The ICNP Dignified Dying Survey consisted of 14 items ranking characteristics of dignified dying, demographic data, and an opened ended question for interventions to promote dignified dying. Thematic analysis was used to identify major themes and categories of interventions based on the conceptual model. Results: Nursing interventions to promote physical comfort included maintaining hygiene and cleanliness and using analgesics to relieve pain. Dignity conserving repertories focused on communication and spiritual comfort. Listening was the most frequent intervention listed by U.S. nurses. Spiritual care was the most important intervention mentioned by Indian nurses. Praying with the patient and the use of Hindu rituals were frequently mentioned. Social dignity inventory interventions focused on including the family in care, providing privacy and support. Interventions to promote social dignity included creating a homelike environment and reducing noise. Conclusions: Nurses described interventions to promote dignified dying beyond the management of physical symptoms. Results of this study will contribute to the ongoing development of the ICNP and nursing interventions to improve and promote dignified dying.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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