Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment and Discharge Teaching Practices of Emergency Department Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158353
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment and Discharge Teaching Practices of Emergency Department Nurses
Abstract:
Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment and Discharge Teaching Practices of Emergency Department Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Bay, Esther, PhD RN
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Contact Address:A417 W. Fee Hall, Center for Nursing Research, E. Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:517 353 8681
Co-Authors:E.H. Bay, , Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI;
Because nurses are largely involved in the admission assessment and discharge teaching of persons with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), we examined the alignment of assessment and discharge teaching practices of Emergency Department (ED) nurses in relation to the 2006 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Acute Concussion Evaluation guidelines. The primary purpose was to describe the assessment and discharge teaching practices of ED nurses in the Midwest, as specified by the CDC guidelines. The following specific aims were addressed: 1) describe the extent to which ED nurses assess for clinical indicators and symptoms of MTBI. 2) describe the extent to which ED nurses perform discharge teachings according to the CDC guidelines. A survey which queried ED nurses use of the CDC ACE care plan for assessment and discharge teaching after MTBI was constructed, assessed for face validity and piloted tested. Following revisions of the survey for clarity and alignment with CDC protocols, procedures as described by Dillman were followed for mailing the survey to 500 randomly selected RNs who were members of the Emergency Nurse's Association and resided and practiced in the Midwest during Summer 2008. Results: Eighty-seven registered nurses (20% response rate) who met the inclusion criterion were included in the final analysis. Predominately, nurses reported assessing the physical and cognitive symptoms more than emotional or sleep indicators. Cognitive symptoms were rated as most important when establishing the MTBI diagnosis, but some cognitive symptoms were rarely assessed. Generally, nurses reported to be doing injury-specific discharge teaching and to be using printed, verbal or written instructions. Instructions focused on prevention and symptom management were infrequently performed. Conclusions: While nurses report routine assessment of the physical or cognitive symptoms of MTBI, standardized assessments performed by nurses should be more closely aligned with those of the CDC. Discharge teaching appears to focus more on injury-specific items with little evidence that information about preventing future brain injuries or worsening of symptoms was provided.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMild Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment and Discharge Teaching Practices of Emergency Department Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158353-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment and Discharge Teaching Practices of Emergency Department Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bay, Esther, PhD RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">A417 W. Fee Hall, Center for Nursing Research, E. Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517 353 8681</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">baye@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E.H. Bay, , Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Because nurses are largely involved in the admission assessment and discharge teaching of persons with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), we examined the alignment of assessment and discharge teaching practices of Emergency Department (ED) nurses in relation to the 2006 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Acute Concussion Evaluation guidelines. The primary purpose was to describe the assessment and discharge teaching practices of ED nurses in the Midwest, as specified by the CDC guidelines. The following specific aims were addressed: 1) describe the extent to which ED nurses assess for clinical indicators and symptoms of MTBI. 2) describe the extent to which ED nurses perform discharge teachings according to the CDC guidelines. A survey which queried ED nurses use of the CDC ACE care plan for assessment and discharge teaching after MTBI was constructed, assessed for face validity and piloted tested. Following revisions of the survey for clarity and alignment with CDC protocols, procedures as described by Dillman were followed for mailing the survey to 500 randomly selected RNs who were members of the Emergency Nurse's Association and resided and practiced in the Midwest during Summer 2008. Results: Eighty-seven registered nurses (20% response rate) who met the inclusion criterion were included in the final analysis. Predominately, nurses reported assessing the physical and cognitive symptoms more than emotional or sleep indicators. Cognitive symptoms were rated as most important when establishing the MTBI diagnosis, but some cognitive symptoms were rarely assessed. Generally, nurses reported to be doing injury-specific discharge teaching and to be using printed, verbal or written instructions. Instructions focused on prevention and symptom management were infrequently performed. Conclusions: While nurses report routine assessment of the physical or cognitive symptoms of MTBI, standardized assessments performed by nurses should be more closely aligned with those of the CDC. Discharge teaching appears to focus more on injury-specific items with little evidence that information about preventing future brain injuries or worsening of symptoms was provided.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:57:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:57:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.