Enablers and Barriers Contributing to Bone Health Among Early Adolescent Somali Girls Living in Minnesota

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158354
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enablers and Barriers Contributing to Bone Health Among Early Adolescent Somali Girls Living in Minnesota
Abstract:
Enablers and Barriers Contributing to Bone Health Among Early Adolescent Somali Girls Living in Minnesota
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Benbenek, Mary, M.S., PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612 626-5236
Co-Authors:M.M. Benbenek, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
Purpose: This descriptive qualitative study aimed to (a) gain a better understanding of the socio-cultural and environmental factors that shape lifestyle practices contributing to bone health including the dietary intake of foods high in calcium and vitamin D, sunlight exposure, and physical activity, and (b) to identify enablers and barriers to these lifestyle practices among early adolescent Somali girls who live in urban and more rural areas of Minnesota. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Urie Bronfenbrenner's socio-ecological theory is used as the framework for this study. This theory recognizes the complex relationships between the individuals and their numerous environments and considers the individual's development within and across different levels of these environments. This theory acknowledges the social, cultural, historical, and environmental influences on development and behaviors over time. Subjects: Four cohorts, each including 5-12 girls of Somali ethnicity, ages 11-14 years, were recruited from two Minnesota communities, Minneapolis and Owatonna, for participation. Methods: A series of three focus groups was conducted with each cohort of girls, a younger cohort and an older cohort from each community, to gather information about enablers and barriers related to diet, dress, activity, and sunlight exposure relative to bone health. The focus groups were conducted according to guidelines published by Krueger and Casey (2000). Results: Descriptive content analysis was utilized to summarize information derived from the data and to identify categories and common themes that emerged from the data. Conclusion: Cultural tradition and gender roles heavily shape lifestyle practices contributing to bone health. Acculturation and developmental state also impact diet, dress, activity, and sunlight exposure among Somali girls 11 to 14 years living in Minnesota. These findings must be considered when designing and implementing bone health promotion strategies within this group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnablers and Barriers Contributing to Bone Health Among Early Adolescent Somali Girls Living in Minnesotaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158354-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Enablers and Barriers Contributing to Bone Health Among Early Adolescent Somali Girls Living in Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Benbenek, Mary, M.S., PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612 626-5236</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">benbe001@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.M. Benbenek, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This descriptive qualitative study aimed to (a) gain a better understanding of the socio-cultural and environmental factors that shape lifestyle practices contributing to bone health including the dietary intake of foods high in calcium and vitamin D, sunlight exposure, and physical activity, and (b) to identify enablers and barriers to these lifestyle practices among early adolescent Somali girls who live in urban and more rural areas of Minnesota. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Urie Bronfenbrenner's socio-ecological theory is used as the framework for this study. This theory recognizes the complex relationships between the individuals and their numerous environments and considers the individual's development within and across different levels of these environments. This theory acknowledges the social, cultural, historical, and environmental influences on development and behaviors over time. Subjects: Four cohorts, each including 5-12 girls of Somali ethnicity, ages 11-14 years, were recruited from two Minnesota communities, Minneapolis and Owatonna, for participation. Methods: A series of three focus groups was conducted with each cohort of girls, a younger cohort and an older cohort from each community, to gather information about enablers and barriers related to diet, dress, activity, and sunlight exposure relative to bone health. The focus groups were conducted according to guidelines published by Krueger and Casey (2000). Results: Descriptive content analysis was utilized to summarize information derived from the data and to identify categories and common themes that emerged from the data. Conclusion: Cultural tradition and gender roles heavily shape lifestyle practices contributing to bone health. Acculturation and developmental state also impact diet, dress, activity, and sunlight exposure among Somali girls 11 to 14 years living in Minnesota. These findings must be considered when designing and implementing bone health promotion strategies within this group.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:58:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:58:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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