2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158355
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Collaborative Evidence-Based Project to Reduce Blood Culture Contamination
Abstract:
A Collaborative Evidence-Based Project to Reduce Blood Culture Contamination
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Connelly, Lynne, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Benedictine College
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:14107 Independence St, Basehor, KS, 66007, USA
Contact Telephone:(913) 588-1657 (w)
Co-Authors:L.M. Connelly, Nursing, Benedictine College, Atchinson, KS; A. Gartner, E. Miquelon, Nursing, University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS; J. Peltzer, Nursing, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS;
When blood cultures are contaminated it costs the institution and the patient money as well as the discomfort of another blood draw. In addition, the patient usually receives antibiotics longer than needed, until a second set of blood cultures are collected and reported. A multi-disciplinary group including the Nursing Research Council, Nursing Practice Council, Nursing Quality Council and the Laboratory conducted an Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) study comparing blood culture contamination rates before and after the institution of selected procedures to reduce the contamination (i.e. wearing a mask and following specific procedure). On the initial pilot study of four units, two of the units show some improvement although in one case this may be represent normal variation and two did not show improvement. This project then evolved into a series of studies including examining central line draws, targeting a specific unit (ER) for improvement and finally testing on three other units the use of a sterile procedure the ER developed that reduced their contamination rates from average over 6 months of 3.81% (with a high of 5.31%) to 1.5% over 3 months. This presentation will include lessons learned from an exemplar EBP project. The implication of this project is that there is often the need to conduct a series of projects to develop a protocol that will work for an entire organization.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Collaborative Evidence-Based Project to Reduce Blood Culture Contaminationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158355-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Collaborative Evidence-Based Project to Reduce Blood Culture Contamination</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connelly, Lynne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Benedictine College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14107 Independence St, Basehor, KS, 66007, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(913) 588-1657 (w)</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lconnelly@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.M. Connelly, Nursing, Benedictine College, Atchinson, KS; A. Gartner, E. Miquelon, Nursing, University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS; J. Peltzer, Nursing, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">When blood cultures are contaminated it costs the institution and the patient money as well as the discomfort of another blood draw. In addition, the patient usually receives antibiotics longer than needed, until a second set of blood cultures are collected and reported. A multi-disciplinary group including the Nursing Research Council, Nursing Practice Council, Nursing Quality Council and the Laboratory conducted an Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) study comparing blood culture contamination rates before and after the institution of selected procedures to reduce the contamination (i.e. wearing a mask and following specific procedure). On the initial pilot study of four units, two of the units show some improvement although in one case this may be represent normal variation and two did not show improvement. This project then evolved into a series of studies including examining central line draws, targeting a specific unit (ER) for improvement and finally testing on three other units the use of a sterile procedure the ER developed that reduced their contamination rates from average over 6 months of 3.81% (with a high of 5.31%) to 1.5% over 3 months. This presentation will include lessons learned from an exemplar EBP project. The implication of this project is that there is often the need to conduct a series of projects to develop a protocol that will work for an entire organization.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:58:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:58:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.