2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158357
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Aggressive Events in Adolescent Dating Violence
Abstract:
Aggressive Events in Adolescent Dating Violence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Draucker, Claire, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Kent, OH, 44242-001, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8805
Co-Authors:C.B. Draucker, D.S. Martsolf, C.B. Cook, J. Risko, D. Sheehan, C. Ferguson, P. Stephenson, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH; K. Washington, S. Perkins, Center for the Treatment and Study of Traumatic Stress, Summa Health Systems, Akron,
Purpose: Adolescent dating violence is a prevalent public health problem associated with a number of negative physical and psychosocial health consequences. In order to develop selective interventions for at-risk populations, a better understanding of the heterogeneity of adolescent dating violence is needed. The purpose of this study was to develop a typology of common aggressive events that occur in the context of adolescent dating relationships. Theoretical/conceptual framework: A situational/events perspective was used. In this approach, occurrences of violence, rather than the propensities of individuals to become violent, are the focus of study. Participants: Data were drawn from 42 transcribed interviews of men and women aged 18 to 21 who had experienced dating violence as adolescents. Methodology: Text units (n =184) that contained a description of a specific event involving aggression or violence between the participant and a dating partner were extracted from the transcripts. Cross-case analysis was used. The typology was developed by the identification of repeating patterns of a number of event characteristics, including antecedents of the event, the sequence of escalation and de-escalation of the violence, and the involvement of third parties. Results: The essence of the aggression at the center of the events best accounted for the configurations of event characteristics in the categories. The typology includes nine types of aggressive events: (a) tormenting, (b) tumultuous, (c) explosive, (d) scuffling, (e) violating, (d) threatening, (e) controlling, (f) disparaging, and (g) rejecting, ignoring, or disrespecting. The event characteristics that distinguish each type of event will be discussed. Conclusions: Considering distinctions in types of aggressive episodes offers a promising approach to understanding the heterogeneity of adolescent dating violence. In addition, the typology can serve as an heuristic to promote discussion of dating violence with victimized or at-risk youth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAggressive Events in Adolescent Dating Violenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158357-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Aggressive Events in Adolescent Dating Violence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Draucker, Claire, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Kent, OH, 44242-001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8805</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cdraucke@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.B. Draucker, D.S. Martsolf, C.B. Cook, J. Risko, D. Sheehan, C. Ferguson, P. Stephenson, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH; K. Washington, S. Perkins, Center for the Treatment and Study of Traumatic Stress, Summa Health Systems, Akron,</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Adolescent dating violence is a prevalent public health problem associated with a number of negative physical and psychosocial health consequences. In order to develop selective interventions for at-risk populations, a better understanding of the heterogeneity of adolescent dating violence is needed. The purpose of this study was to develop a typology of common aggressive events that occur in the context of adolescent dating relationships. Theoretical/conceptual framework: A situational/events perspective was used. In this approach, occurrences of violence, rather than the propensities of individuals to become violent, are the focus of study. Participants: Data were drawn from 42 transcribed interviews of men and women aged 18 to 21 who had experienced dating violence as adolescents. Methodology: Text units (n =184) that contained a description of a specific event involving aggression or violence between the participant and a dating partner were extracted from the transcripts. Cross-case analysis was used. The typology was developed by the identification of repeating patterns of a number of event characteristics, including antecedents of the event, the sequence of escalation and de-escalation of the violence, and the involvement of third parties. Results: The essence of the aggression at the center of the events best accounted for the configurations of event characteristics in the categories. The typology includes nine types of aggressive events: (a) tormenting, (b) tumultuous, (c) explosive, (d) scuffling, (e) violating, (d) threatening, (e) controlling, (f) disparaging, and (g) rejecting, ignoring, or disrespecting. The event characteristics that distinguish each type of event will be discussed. Conclusions: Considering distinctions in types of aggressive episodes offers a promising approach to understanding the heterogeneity of adolescent dating violence. In addition, the typology can serve as an heuristic to promote discussion of dating violence with victimized or at-risk youth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:58:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:58:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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