2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158361
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Representations in Persons with Hypertension
Abstract:
Symptom Representations in Persons with Hypertension
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Franklin, Mary, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:920 James K Blvd, Pontiac, MI, 48341, USA
Contact Telephone:248-738-1026
Co-Authors:M.M. Franklin, W. Allen, S. Pickett, R.M. Peters, Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;
Problem: Approximately one in three Americans has hypertension (HTN). Up to 50% of persons with HTN report symptoms associated with their illness. Symptom representations in HTN have not been studied in prior research. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using the Symptom Response Questionnaire (SRQ) to describe symptom representations in persons with HTN. Theory: Leventhal's common sense model (CSM) was the guiding framework for this study. Methods: A descriptive, correlational study was conducted with 51 community-dwelling African-Americans with HTN. Participants were middle-aged (M=55.3 years; SD=8.15), fairly well-educated (M=11.8 years school completed; SD=2.36), but with limited income (70.8% < $10,000 annually). Participants reporting symptoms attributed to HTN completed the 14-item SRQ for each reported symptom. The SRQ contains five subscales (perceived timeline,cause control/cure, consequence, and emotional representations of a symptom) with response options from one (strongly disagree) to five (strongly agree) for each reported symptom. Results: Forty-three percent of participants (n=22;15 men/ 7 women) reported at least one symptom due to their HTN, 27% reported 2 symptoms, 4% reported 3 symptoms. Headaches (50%, n=11), dizziness/lightheadedness (40%, n =9),and visual changes (10%, n=2) were most frequently reported. For their initial symptom, participants demonstrated greater levels (scores > 3) of emotional representations (M=3.45; SD=1.22), consequences (M=3.36; SD=.986), and control/cure (M=3.87;SD=.945). Participants had lesser ratings (< 3.0) of symptom timeline (M=2.93; SD=1.01) and HTN treatment as an attributable cause (M=2.14;SD=1.23). Discussion: Findings are consistent with a premise that HTN is symptomatic from the patient perspective. Participants reported HTN symptoms to be more acute, distressful, amenable to personal control, and have serious consequences. The CSM predicts health behavior and is a foundation for interventions in other chronic illnesses. The SRQ appears to be feasible for use with HTN and may generate knowledge for representation-based interventions to improve blood pressure control and symptom management, two phenomena of salience to nurse clinicians and researchers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Representations in Persons with Hypertensionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158361-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Representations in Persons with Hypertension</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Franklin, Mary, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">920 James K Blvd, Pontiac, MI, 48341, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">248-738-1026</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">af1635@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.M. Franklin, W. Allen, S. Pickett, R.M. Peters, Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Approximately one in three Americans has hypertension (HTN). Up to 50% of persons with HTN report symptoms associated with their illness. Symptom representations in HTN have not been studied in prior research. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using the Symptom Response Questionnaire (SRQ) to describe symptom representations in persons with HTN. Theory: Leventhal's common sense model (CSM) was the guiding framework for this study. Methods: A descriptive, correlational study was conducted with 51 community-dwelling African-Americans with HTN. Participants were middle-aged (M=55.3 years; SD=8.15), fairly well-educated (M=11.8 years school completed; SD=2.36), but with limited income (70.8% &lt; $10,000 annually). Participants reporting symptoms attributed to HTN completed the 14-item SRQ for each reported symptom. The SRQ contains five subscales (perceived timeline,cause control/cure, consequence, and emotional representations of a symptom) with response options from one (strongly disagree) to five (strongly agree) for each reported symptom. Results: Forty-three percent of participants (n=22;15 men/ 7 women) reported at least one symptom due to their HTN, 27% reported 2 symptoms, 4% reported 3 symptoms. Headaches (50%, n=11), dizziness/lightheadedness (40%, n =9),and visual changes (10%, n=2) were most frequently reported. For their initial symptom, participants demonstrated greater levels (scores &gt; 3) of emotional representations (M=3.45; SD=1.22), consequences (M=3.36; SD=.986), and control/cure (M=3.87;SD=.945). Participants had lesser ratings (&lt; 3.0) of symptom timeline (M=2.93; SD=1.01) and HTN treatment as an attributable cause (M=2.14;SD=1.23). Discussion: Findings are consistent with a premise that HTN is symptomatic from the patient perspective. Participants reported HTN symptoms to be more acute, distressful, amenable to personal control, and have serious consequences. The CSM predicts health behavior and is a foundation for interventions in other chronic illnesses. The SRQ appears to be feasible for use with HTN and may generate knowledge for representation-based interventions to improve blood pressure control and symptom management, two phenomena of salience to nurse clinicians and researchers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:58:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:58:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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