2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158363
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Changes in Grip Strength Over 6 years Among Older Women
Abstract:
Changes in Grip Strength Over 6 years Among Older Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Gaspar, Phyllis, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toledo
Contact Address:4001 Hollyhock, Maumee, OH, 43537, USA
Contact Telephone:419-491-1212
Co-Authors:P.M. Gaspar, , University of Toledo, Toledo , OH; M. Johnson, , Winona State University, Winona, MN;
Grip strength has been identified as a predictor of overall function and mortality. The use of this measure was tested among a group of older women over a 6 year period. Aims of this study were: 1) describe changes in grip strength of a select group of older women, and 2) explore differences among subjects who had decline in grip strength as compared to those who did not. The epidemiological web of causation was the framework that guided the study. This study is a secondary analysis using the database of the epidemiological longitudinal study of Health Status and Behaviors of a Midwestern Community of Religious Sisters. For purpose of this analysis only those subjects who had 2 or more years of grip strength available on the database and lived independently (Motherhouse or in the community) or at the assisted living facility were included. Mean age of the 87 subjects was 75.6 (SD=7.4) and ranged from 65 to 98 years. As part of the annual primary study data collection, grip strength was measured using a Smedley III dynamometer. Other data collected were cognitive status (MMSE), functional performance (Guralnik Battery) and general self-rated health (SF-36). Highest grip strength for each year of participation was used for analysis. Subjects varied in years of participation from 2 to 6 years with 15 participating six years. Mean grip strength each year was consistently 22 (+/- .5) kg, which is between the 50th and 75th percentile for females of the corresponding age group. Changes in grip strength ranged from -15 to 8 kg with 41 (47%) having a decline of 2 or more kg. Those with a decline in grip strength had more functional disability, lower self-rated health, and a greater chance of falling. A negative association of age and grip strength existed. Further analysis of a subgroup of subjects (n= 22) including only those who had grip strength scores for both year 1 and year 7, creating a 6 year span, was conducted. Twelve subjects (56%) had a decline in hand grip. This group had higher grip strength at year 1 and a lower functional ability as compared with those who did not have a decline. Further study is necessary to identify clinical outcomes related to a decline in grip strength. Usefulness of grip strength as a screening will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChanges in Grip Strength Over 6 years Among Older Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158363-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Changes in Grip Strength Over 6 years Among Older Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gaspar, Phyllis, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toledo</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4001 Hollyhock, Maumee, OH, 43537, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">419-491-1212</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pgaspar@bex.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.M. Gaspar, , University of Toledo, Toledo , OH; M. Johnson, , Winona State University, Winona, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Grip strength has been identified as a predictor of overall function and mortality. The use of this measure was tested among a group of older women over a 6 year period. Aims of this study were: 1) describe changes in grip strength of a select group of older women, and 2) explore differences among subjects who had decline in grip strength as compared to those who did not. The epidemiological web of causation was the framework that guided the study. This study is a secondary analysis using the database of the epidemiological longitudinal study of Health Status and Behaviors of a Midwestern Community of Religious Sisters. For purpose of this analysis only those subjects who had 2 or more years of grip strength available on the database and lived independently (Motherhouse or in the community) or at the assisted living facility were included. Mean age of the 87 subjects was 75.6 (SD=7.4) and ranged from 65 to 98 years. As part of the annual primary study data collection, grip strength was measured using a Smedley III dynamometer. Other data collected were cognitive status (MMSE), functional performance (Guralnik Battery) and general self-rated health (SF-36). Highest grip strength for each year of participation was used for analysis. Subjects varied in years of participation from 2 to 6 years with 15 participating six years. Mean grip strength each year was consistently 22 (+/- .5) kg, which is between the 50th and 75th percentile for females of the corresponding age group. Changes in grip strength ranged from -15 to 8 kg with 41 (47%) having a decline of 2 or more kg. Those with a decline in grip strength had more functional disability, lower self-rated health, and a greater chance of falling. A negative association of age and grip strength existed. Further analysis of a subgroup of subjects (n= 22) including only those who had grip strength scores for both year 1 and year 7, creating a 6 year span, was conducted. Twelve subjects (56%) had a decline in hand grip. This group had higher grip strength at year 1 and a lower functional ability as compared with those who did not have a decline. Further study is necessary to identify clinical outcomes related to a decline in grip strength. Usefulness of grip strength as a screening will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:58:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:58:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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