Exercise in Patients Receiving Intensive Cancer Therapy: Results from the Second Phase of Testing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158364
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exercise in Patients Receiving Intensive Cancer Therapy: Results from the Second Phase of Testing
Abstract:
Exercise in Patients Receiving Intensive Cancer Therapy: Results from the Second Phase of Testing
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hacker, Eileen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Department of Biobehavioral Health Science
Contact Address:845 S. Damen (M/C 802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-7924
Co-Authors:E.D. Hacker, D. Peace, D. Rondelli, L. Dobogai, A. Kujath, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; J.L. Larson , , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;
Problem: Patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience considerable reductions in physical activity and deterioration of their health status due to intensive cancer therapy. Strength training has been identified as a potential intervention, although limited information is available to evaluate its use following HSCT. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects of strength training compared to usual activity on physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions, and quality of life following HSCT. Conceptual Framework: The Revised Wilson and Cleary Conceptual Model of Patient Outcomes guided the study. Methods: Twenty-two patients scheduled to undergo HSCT agreed to participate in this two-group, randomized controlled study. The strength training intervention was introduced in the hospital and continued for six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Dependent variables included physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions and quality of life. Variables were measured prior to admission to the hospital for HSCT, day 8 following HSCT, and six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Analysis: Split-plot ANOVAs were used to examine differences between groups, over time, and the interaction effect. Results: Significant time effects were noted for many variables with anticipated declines in physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, and health status perceptions immediately after HSCT with subsequent improvements six weeks following hospital discharge. One group effect was noted with subjects in the exercise group reporting less fatigue than subjects in the control group. Although no significant interactions were detected, several variables, such as physical activity, approached significance with the exercise group exhibiting enhanced recovery compared to the usual activity group six weeks following hospital discharge. Nursing Implications: This pilot study demonstrates that it is feasible for patients receiving HSCT to participate in strength training and a randomized controlled trial testing the effects of strength training on quality of life outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExercise in Patients Receiving Intensive Cancer Therapy: Results from the Second Phase of Testingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158364-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exercise in Patients Receiving Intensive Cancer Therapy: Results from the Second Phase of Testing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hacker, Eileen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Department of Biobehavioral Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen (M/C 802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-7924</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ehacker@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E.D. Hacker, D. Peace, D. Rondelli, L. Dobogai, A. Kujath, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; J.L. Larson , , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience considerable reductions in physical activity and deterioration of their health status due to intensive cancer therapy. Strength training has been identified as a potential intervention, although limited information is available to evaluate its use following HSCT. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects of strength training compared to usual activity on physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions, and quality of life following HSCT. Conceptual Framework: The Revised Wilson and Cleary Conceptual Model of Patient Outcomes guided the study. Methods: Twenty-two patients scheduled to undergo HSCT agreed to participate in this two-group, randomized controlled study. The strength training intervention was introduced in the hospital and continued for six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Dependent variables included physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions and quality of life. Variables were measured prior to admission to the hospital for HSCT, day 8 following HSCT, and six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Analysis: Split-plot ANOVAs were used to examine differences between groups, over time, and the interaction effect. Results: Significant time effects were noted for many variables with anticipated declines in physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, and health status perceptions immediately after HSCT with subsequent improvements six weeks following hospital discharge. One group effect was noted with subjects in the exercise group reporting less fatigue than subjects in the control group. Although no significant interactions were detected, several variables, such as physical activity, approached significance with the exercise group exhibiting enhanced recovery compared to the usual activity group six weeks following hospital discharge. Nursing Implications: This pilot study demonstrates that it is feasible for patients receiving HSCT to participate in strength training and a randomized controlled trial testing the effects of strength training on quality of life outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:58:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:58:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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