Interactions of Health Care Providers with Young Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158366
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interactions of Health Care Providers with Young Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer
Abstract:
Interactions of Health Care Providers with Young Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hamilton, Rebekah
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois-Chicago
Contact Address:College of Nursing MC 802, Room 820, Chicago, IL, 60657, USA
Contact Telephone:3129967942
Co-Authors:R. Hamilton, Women, Children and Family Health Science, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Young women (18-39 years of age) at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) who seek to know their risk for cancer and their options after genetic testing for the BRCA mutations interact with many different health care providers. The purpose of this study was to identify similarities and differences in encounters with advanced practice nurses specializing in genetics (APN-G), genetic counselors (GC), breast surgeons and gynecologists (MDs). Thirty three health care providers were interviewed (11 APN-Gs, 17 GCs, 5 MDs) in face-to-face, phone, or email interviews. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes based on the underlying ideas, assumptions and ideologies of the participants. Three specific questions were addressed : 1) Did distinct specialties of health care providers interact differently with young women at risk for HBOC? 2) Where there areas of inconsistent information among health care providers? 3) Did the health care providers have different impressions of young women at risk for HBOC and how they understood their risk? These questions were informed by the author's previous studies with young women who carry a BRCA mutation and their reports of various interactions with health care providers. Most of the participants had interacted with many young women and their family members who were at risk for HBOC. Some health care providers (APN-G's and surgeons) tended to be more directive about follow-up after genetic testing indicated the young woman carried a BRCA mutation than others (GC's and Gynecologists). For this sample, there were no significant discrepancies in information provided. All providers were concerned that the young woman be aware of her risk for breast and ovarian cancer and make decisions to ameliorate that risk. All providers discussed issues of insurance coverage which can be problematic with this age group. Various health care providers interact with young women at risk for HBOC and while differences did exist in these interactions there was little difference in the over all information given to this population. Health care providers need to be aware of the unique needs of this young population at risk for early onset of breast cancer and ovarian cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInteractions of Health Care Providers with Young Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158366-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interactions of Health Care Providers with Young Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hamilton, Rebekah</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois-Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing MC 802, Room 820, Chicago, IL, 60657, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3129967942</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hamilr@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Hamilton, Women, Children and Family Health Science, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Young women (18-39 years of age) at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) who seek to know their risk for cancer and their options after genetic testing for the BRCA mutations interact with many different health care providers. The purpose of this study was to identify similarities and differences in encounters with advanced practice nurses specializing in genetics (APN-G), genetic counselors (GC), breast surgeons and gynecologists (MDs). Thirty three health care providers were interviewed (11 APN-Gs, 17 GCs, 5 MDs) in face-to-face, phone, or email interviews. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes based on the underlying ideas, assumptions and ideologies of the participants. Three specific questions were addressed : 1) Did distinct specialties of health care providers interact differently with young women at risk for HBOC? 2) Where there areas of inconsistent information among health care providers? 3) Did the health care providers have different impressions of young women at risk for HBOC and how they understood their risk? These questions were informed by the author's previous studies with young women who carry a BRCA mutation and their reports of various interactions with health care providers. Most of the participants had interacted with many young women and their family members who were at risk for HBOC. Some health care providers (APN-G's and surgeons) tended to be more directive about follow-up after genetic testing indicated the young woman carried a BRCA mutation than others (GC's and Gynecologists). For this sample, there were no significant discrepancies in information provided. All providers were concerned that the young woman be aware of her risk for breast and ovarian cancer and make decisions to ameliorate that risk. All providers discussed issues of insurance coverage which can be problematic with this age group. Various health care providers interact with young women at risk for HBOC and while differences did exist in these interactions there was little difference in the over all information given to this population. Health care providers need to be aware of the unique needs of this young population at risk for early onset of breast cancer and ovarian cancer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:58:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:58:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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