Development and Testing of an Instrument for Measuring Perceived Self-Efficacy for Fatigue Self-Management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158367
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and Testing of an Instrument for Measuring Perceived Self-Efficacy for Fatigue Self-Management
Abstract:
Development and Testing of an Instrument for Measuring Perceived Self-Efficacy for Fatigue Self-Management
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hoffman, Amy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:422 West Fee Hall, E. Lansing, MI, 48824-1315, USA
Contact Telephone:616-682-0289
Co-Authors:A.J. Hoffman, A.G. Gift, B.A. Given, M. Rothert, Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; A. von Eye, Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; C.W. Given, Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI;
Purpose: Fatigue is a symptom commonly reported by persons with serious chronic illness. Measurement of perceived self-efficacy for fatigue self-management (PSEFSM) in persons with serious chronic illness is essential if fatigue is to be monitored and enhanced to improve physical functional status (PFS). The purpose of this study is to describe the development and testing of a PSEFSM Instrument. Theoretical Framework: Development was guided by Bandura's Self-Efficacy Theory which explains the cognitive process of symptom self-management to show how increasing a patient's PSE to manage symptoms can enhance a patient's ability to manage their symptoms to achieve optimal PFS. Methods: The PSEFSM Instrument was incorporated into two randomized control trials for secondary analysis of 298 participants, 63 persons with lung cancer (LC) and 235 persons with other cancer diagnoses (OC) undergoing a course of chemotherapy. Results: Internal consistency reliability resulted in a Cronbach's alpha ranging from .91-.92 for persons with LC and OC diagnoses and the total sample. Evidence for construct validity and generalizability was supported through hypotheses testing of the mediation pathway from fatigue to PFS through PSEFSM in all three groups indicating support for partial mediation. In the total sample, the magnitude of the relationship between fatigue and PFS was reduced after PSEFSM was controlled, with mediation accounting for 12% of the variance (t = -2.59; p = .009). Using LISREL, the results from structural modeling provided further evidence of construct validity. The results of the hypothesized model indicated a good model fit with six observed variables predicting one latent variable, PSEFSM, and the latent variable PSEFSM indicated by itself explaining 80% of the outcome variable (RMSEA = 0.00). Implications: The instrument provides a reliable and valid measure of PSEFSM that could be used to facilitate the development of interventions to increase PSE to achieve optimal symptom self-management.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and Testing of an Instrument for Measuring Perceived Self-Efficacy for Fatigue Self-Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158367-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development and Testing of an Instrument for Measuring Perceived Self-Efficacy for Fatigue Self-Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hoffman, Amy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">422 West Fee Hall, E. Lansing, MI, 48824-1315, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">616-682-0289</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amy.hoffman@ht.msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A.J. Hoffman, A.G. Gift, B.A. Given, M. Rothert, Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; A. von Eye, Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; C.W. Given, Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Fatigue is a symptom commonly reported by persons with serious chronic illness. Measurement of perceived self-efficacy for fatigue self-management (PSEFSM) in persons with serious chronic illness is essential if fatigue is to be monitored and enhanced to improve physical functional status (PFS). The purpose of this study is to describe the development and testing of a PSEFSM Instrument. Theoretical Framework: Development was guided by Bandura's Self-Efficacy Theory which explains the cognitive process of symptom self-management to show how increasing a patient's PSE to manage symptoms can enhance a patient's ability to manage their symptoms to achieve optimal PFS. Methods: The PSEFSM Instrument was incorporated into two randomized control trials for secondary analysis of 298 participants, 63 persons with lung cancer (LC) and 235 persons with other cancer diagnoses (OC) undergoing a course of chemotherapy. Results: Internal consistency reliability resulted in a Cronbach's alpha ranging from .91-.92 for persons with LC and OC diagnoses and the total sample. Evidence for construct validity and generalizability was supported through hypotheses testing of the mediation pathway from fatigue to PFS through PSEFSM in all three groups indicating support for partial mediation. In the total sample, the magnitude of the relationship between fatigue and PFS was reduced after PSEFSM was controlled, with mediation accounting for 12% of the variance (t = -2.59; p = .009). Using LISREL, the results from structural modeling provided further evidence of construct validity. The results of the hypothesized model indicated a good model fit with six observed variables predicting one latent variable, PSEFSM, and the latent variable PSEFSM indicated by itself explaining 80% of the outcome variable (RMSEA = 0.00). Implications: The instrument provides a reliable and valid measure of PSEFSM that could be used to facilitate the development of interventions to increase PSE to achieve optimal symptom self-management.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:58:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:58:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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