The Influence of a Novel Educational Intervention on Nursing Students' Clinical Decision-Making Skills

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158368
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of a Novel Educational Intervention on Nursing Students' Clinical Decision-Making Skills
Abstract:
The Influence of a Novel Educational Intervention on Nursing Students' Clinical Decision-Making Skills
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Jenkins, Sheryl, PhD, ACNP
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Mennonite College of Nursing
Contact Address:Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61761, USA
Contact Telephone:309-242-6720
Co-Authors:P. Lindsey, S. Jenkins, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;
Health care organizations expect new nurses to join the workforce with excellent clinical decision-making skills. Many nursing programs now use clinical simulation to teach psychomotor skills and enhance clinical decision-making ability. Few studies, however, have evaluated the effectiveness of simulation on clinical decision-making skills. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of a novel educational intervention on student nurses' clinical decision-making ability regarding the management of patients experiencing rapid clinical deterioration. The concept of self-efficacy serves as a theoretical framework for examining the impact of clinical simulation on student nurses' care decisions during a Rapid Response Team scenario. Participants of this study were baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in the final semester of their program at a Midwestern public university. A randomized sample of students were given a novel educational intervention involving an in- depth verbal presentation and clinical simulation of a Rapid Response Team scenario. The control group of students received traditional basic education regarding Rapid Response Teams. Written Rapid Response Team vignettes were administered to both the interventional and control groups to evaluate their clinical decision making regarding management of rapidly deteriorating patients. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze and compare responses to the vignettes. Results will be reported. Key Words: Clinical Decision-Making, Clinical Simulation, Rapid Response Team
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of a Novel Educational Intervention on Nursing Students' Clinical Decision-Making Skillsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158368-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of a Novel Educational Intervention on Nursing Students' Clinical Decision-Making Skills</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jenkins, Sheryl, PhD, ACNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Mennonite College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61761, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-242-6720</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sjenkin@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P. Lindsey, S. Jenkins, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Health care organizations expect new nurses to join the workforce with excellent clinical decision-making skills. Many nursing programs now use clinical simulation to teach psychomotor skills and enhance clinical decision-making ability. Few studies, however, have evaluated the effectiveness of simulation on clinical decision-making skills. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of a novel educational intervention on student nurses' clinical decision-making ability regarding the management of patients experiencing rapid clinical deterioration. The concept of self-efficacy serves as a theoretical framework for examining the impact of clinical simulation on student nurses' care decisions during a Rapid Response Team scenario. Participants of this study were baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in the final semester of their program at a Midwestern public university. A randomized sample of students were given a novel educational intervention involving an in- depth verbal presentation and clinical simulation of a Rapid Response Team scenario. The control group of students received traditional basic education regarding Rapid Response Teams. Written Rapid Response Team vignettes were administered to both the interventional and control groups to evaluate their clinical decision making regarding management of rapidly deteriorating patients. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze and compare responses to the vignettes. Results will be reported. Key Words: Clinical Decision-Making, Clinical Simulation, Rapid Response Team</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:58:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:58:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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