D.A.Y. (Designed Around You): Evaluation of an Innovative Transitional Care Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158369
Type:
Presentation
Title:
D.A.Y. (Designed Around You): Evaluation of an Innovative Transitional Care Program
Abstract:
D.A.Y. (Designed Around You): Evaluation of an Innovative Transitional Care Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Jones, Katherine, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Bolton School of Nursing
Contact Address:10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-5979
Co-Authors:K.R. Jones, S. Tullai-McGuinness, M. Dolansky, A. Farag, M. Krivanek, Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
Purpose: To evaluate outcomes associated with an innovative post-acute care program for older adults. Background: Facilitating the safe transition of persons from the acute care hospital to home is a priority issue, given the frequency with which individuals are readmitted within 30 days of discharge. Many of these patients require rehabilitation services, but reimbursement policy currently limits available options for continuing care. In addition, families may need education and home environments may need to be modified to ensure patient safety. Intervention: The D.A.Y. Program is a structured 8 week program that has been integrated into an existing senior day care program. The goals are to prepare patients for independent and safe functioning, help families prepare for new care requirements, assess and modify the home environment as needed, and identify and address clinical and functional issues as they occur in the early post-discharge period. Daily nursing assessments, discharge planning, and medication supervision are provided, along with onsite physical and occupational therapy, and mental and social stimulation. Additional services include wound care, dietary supervision, and glucose monitoring. Subjects: 33 individuals enrolled in the program between 2005-2008. Subjects were primarily women (61%), white (100%),Medicare insured (91%), 76 years old (range 51-91), and had an adult child caregiver (58%). Most frequent diagnoses were CVA, knee/hip repair, subdural hematoma, and encephalopathy. All received physical therapy, while 91% received OT and 36% received speech therapy. Results: Subjects achieved 74% of their physical therapy goals and 54% of their occupational therapy goals by time of discharge. Only 6.1% were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days while 21% were readmitted within 90 days. All of the subjects rated satisfaction with the program very highly; 100% said that they would recommend the program to others. Cost and convenience were issues for family members. Conclusion: The D.A.Y program is a viable alternative to post-discharge services delivered by SNFs and Home Health Agencies. Such programs should be reimbursed by Medicare, especially considering the lower readmission rate.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleD.A.Y. (Designed Around You): Evaluation of an Innovative Transitional Care Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158369-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">D.A.Y. (Designed Around You): Evaluation of an Innovative Transitional Care Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Katherine, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Bolton School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-5979</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">katherine.jones@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.R. Jones, S. Tullai-McGuinness, M. Dolansky, A. Farag, M. Krivanek, Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To evaluate outcomes associated with an innovative post-acute care program for older adults. Background: Facilitating the safe transition of persons from the acute care hospital to home is a priority issue, given the frequency with which individuals are readmitted within 30 days of discharge. Many of these patients require rehabilitation services, but reimbursement policy currently limits available options for continuing care. In addition, families may need education and home environments may need to be modified to ensure patient safety. Intervention: The D.A.Y. Program is a structured 8 week program that has been integrated into an existing senior day care program. The goals are to prepare patients for independent and safe functioning, help families prepare for new care requirements, assess and modify the home environment as needed, and identify and address clinical and functional issues as they occur in the early post-discharge period. Daily nursing assessments, discharge planning, and medication supervision are provided, along with onsite physical and occupational therapy, and mental and social stimulation. Additional services include wound care, dietary supervision, and glucose monitoring. Subjects: 33 individuals enrolled in the program between 2005-2008. Subjects were primarily women (61%), white (100%),Medicare insured (91%), 76 years old (range 51-91), and had an adult child caregiver (58%). Most frequent diagnoses were CVA, knee/hip repair, subdural hematoma, and encephalopathy. All received physical therapy, while 91% received OT and 36% received speech therapy. Results: Subjects achieved 74% of their physical therapy goals and 54% of their occupational therapy goals by time of discharge. Only 6.1% were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days while 21% were readmitted within 90 days. All of the subjects rated satisfaction with the program very highly; 100% said that they would recommend the program to others. Cost and convenience were issues for family members. Conclusion: The D.A.Y program is a viable alternative to post-discharge services delivered by SNFs and Home Health Agencies. Such programs should be reimbursed by Medicare, especially considering the lower readmission rate.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:58:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:58:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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