Family Influences on Adolescents' Sexual Behaviors: Family Structure and Function, Perceived Expectancy and Self-Efficacy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158371
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Influences on Adolescents' Sexual Behaviors: Family Structure and Function, Perceived Expectancy and Self-Efficacy
Abstract:
Family Influences on Adolescents' Sexual Behaviors: Family Structure and Function, Perceived Expectancy and Self-Efficacy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kao, Tsui-Sui, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5482, USA
Contact Telephone:734-647-0147
Co-Authors:T.A. Kao, C. Loveland-Cherry , School of Nursing , University of Michigan , Ann Arbor, MI;
Purpose: Compared to other developed countries, the rates of STIs and HIV/AIDS remain alarmingly high for adolescents in the United States. Although adolescents' self-efficacy is protective for adolescents' sexual behaviors, how adolescents' self-efficacy develops related to family dynamics and, consequently, their sexual behaviors is not clear. This study expands a causal model tested earlier and evaluates the addition of self efficacy, perceived parental attitudes about birth control use, family structure (i.e., type, income, and parental education level), and other sexual behaviors (e.g., number of sex partners, and contraception use) overtime. Method: A secondary analysis of Waves 1, 2, and 3 (1994-2003) data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health was conducted to explore family influences on adolescents' development of perceived expectancy, self-efficacy, and sexual behaviors. An analysis of longitudinal data from 9067 adolescents (white=5817; nonwhite= 3238) between the ages of 11 and 16 at Wave 1 and their mothers was conducted using structural equation modeling. Result: The fit indices show that the models fit the data fairly well (S-B X2=1191.36, 60df, N=9067, p=.000; NFI=.937; CFI=.940, RMSEA = .046). The model explained (R2) approximately 17.1% of variances in perceived expectancy, 59.5% in self efficacy, 49.9% in the number of sexual partners, 53.8% in condom use, and 33.3% in sexual debut. The patterns of mother-adolescent interaction were closely related to adolescents' age and their family structure. Mothers' perceptions of connectedness predicted higher adolescents' perceived expectancy and self-efficacy. Adolescents' perceived expectancy predicted fewer sex partners, later sexual onset, and less risky sexual behavior (in terms of condom use). Adolescents' self efficacy was related to later sexual onset and less risky sexual behaviors, but was positively related to more sex partners. In summary, adolescents' family structure and family dynamics play important roles on adolescents' sexual behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Influences on Adolescents' Sexual Behaviors: Family Structure and Function, Perceived Expectancy and Self-Efficacyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158371-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Influences on Adolescents' Sexual Behaviors: Family Structure and Function, Perceived Expectancy and Self-Efficacy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kao, Tsui-Sui, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-647-0147</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">anniekao@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T.A. Kao, C. Loveland-Cherry , School of Nursing , University of Michigan , Ann Arbor, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Compared to other developed countries, the rates of STIs and HIV/AIDS remain alarmingly high for adolescents in the United States. Although adolescents' self-efficacy is protective for adolescents' sexual behaviors, how adolescents' self-efficacy develops related to family dynamics and, consequently, their sexual behaviors is not clear. This study expands a causal model tested earlier and evaluates the addition of self efficacy, perceived parental attitudes about birth control use, family structure (i.e., type, income, and parental education level), and other sexual behaviors (e.g., number of sex partners, and contraception use) overtime. Method: A secondary analysis of Waves 1, 2, and 3 (1994-2003) data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health was conducted to explore family influences on adolescents' development of perceived expectancy, self-efficacy, and sexual behaviors. An analysis of longitudinal data from 9067 adolescents (white=5817; nonwhite= 3238) between the ages of 11 and 16 at Wave 1 and their mothers was conducted using structural equation modeling. Result: The fit indices show that the models fit the data fairly well (S-B X2=1191.36, 60df, N=9067, p=.000; NFI=.937; CFI=.940, RMSEA = .046). The model explained (R2) approximately 17.1% of variances in perceived expectancy, 59.5% in self efficacy, 49.9% in the number of sexual partners, 53.8% in condom use, and 33.3% in sexual debut. The patterns of mother-adolescent interaction were closely related to adolescents' age and their family structure. Mothers' perceptions of connectedness predicted higher adolescents' perceived expectancy and self-efficacy. Adolescents' perceived expectancy predicted fewer sex partners, later sexual onset, and less risky sexual behavior (in terms of condom use). Adolescents' self efficacy was related to later sexual onset and less risky sexual behaviors, but was positively related to more sex partners. In summary, adolescents' family structure and family dynamics play important roles on adolescents' sexual behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:59:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:59:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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