Measuring the Psychosocial Domain of Responsibility in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Dataset

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158372
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring the Psychosocial Domain of Responsibility in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Dataset
Abstract:
Measuring the Psychosocial Domain of Responsibility in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Dataset
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Keeler, Heidi, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:904 Mayfair Drive, (home), Belleville, IL, 62221, USA
Contact Telephone:618-416-1614
Co-Authors:H.J. Keeler, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Problem/Purpose: Psychosocial maturity has been identified as an important component of adolescent judgment to engage in risk behavior. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a tool to measure responsibility, a component of psychosocial maturity. Theoretical Framework: The Integrative Model of Adolescent Health Risk Behavior (IMAHRB) (Keeler & Kaiser, in press) describes psychosocial maturity as composed of temperance, perspective, and responsibility. All three components of psychosocial maturity are instrumental in reducing adolescent health risk behavior. Methods/Design: Thirteen items for the responsibility scale were selected from the Add Health dataset, a nationally representative sample for use in secondary analysis (Harris, 2008). The sample was comprised of 1264 non-virginal adolescents. Analysis: Content validity was determined using item consistency with Steinberg and Cauffman's conceptualization of adolescent judgment in risk behavior, which includes self efficacy and self esteem as components of responsibility. Construct validity was evaluated by exploratory factor analysis (EFA) in SPSS and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) in MPlus. Cronbach's alpha was used to determine internal consistency reliability. Findings: EFA: A three factor solution emerged, labeled self esteem, self efficacy, and physical fitness. The physical fitness items also loaded onto self esteem. Initial CFA: When items were constrained into 2 factors, model fit statistics were within acceptable limits (Brown, 2006): X² = 407.515, df=64, p<.000; RMSEA=.064, 90% C.I. (.059-.071), p <.000; SRMR=.038, CFI=0.924. Internal consistency was acceptable as measured by Cronbach's alpha=.793. Relevance to nursing practice: Future findings resulting from tool use can guide community health nurses in the development of health promotion interventions. This tool will enable the study of responsible sexual behavior in adolescents within the framework of the IMAHRB using the Add Health dataset.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring the Psychosocial Domain of Responsibility in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Dataseten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158372-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring the Psychosocial Domain of Responsibility in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Dataset</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keeler, Heidi, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">904 Mayfair Drive, (home), Belleville, IL, 62221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618-416-1614</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hkeeler@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">H.J. Keeler, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem/Purpose: Psychosocial maturity has been identified as an important component of adolescent judgment to engage in risk behavior. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a tool to measure responsibility, a component of psychosocial maturity. Theoretical Framework: The Integrative Model of Adolescent Health Risk Behavior (IMAHRB) (Keeler &amp; Kaiser, in press) describes psychosocial maturity as composed of temperance, perspective, and responsibility. All three components of psychosocial maturity are instrumental in reducing adolescent health risk behavior. Methods/Design: Thirteen items for the responsibility scale were selected from the Add Health dataset, a nationally representative sample for use in secondary analysis (Harris, 2008). The sample was comprised of 1264 non-virginal adolescents. Analysis: Content validity was determined using item consistency with Steinberg and Cauffman's conceptualization of adolescent judgment in risk behavior, which includes self efficacy and self esteem as components of responsibility. Construct validity was evaluated by exploratory factor analysis (EFA) in SPSS and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) in MPlus. Cronbach's alpha was used to determine internal consistency reliability. Findings: EFA: A three factor solution emerged, labeled self esteem, self efficacy, and physical fitness. The physical fitness items also loaded onto self esteem. Initial CFA: When items were constrained into 2 factors, model fit statistics were within acceptable limits (Brown, 2006): X&sup2; = 407.515, df=64, p&lt;.000; RMSEA=.064, 90% C.I. (.059-.071), p &lt;.000; SRMR=.038, CFI=0.924. Internal consistency was acceptable as measured by Cronbach's alpha=.793. Relevance to nursing practice: Future findings resulting from tool use can guide community health nurses in the development of health promotion interventions. This tool will enable the study of responsible sexual behavior in adolescents within the framework of the IMAHRB using the Add Health dataset.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:59:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:59:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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