Efficacy of a computer-based bilingual tailored hearing loss prevention program for Latino construction workers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158374
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of a computer-based bilingual tailored hearing loss prevention program for Latino construction workers
Abstract:
Efficacy of a computer-based bilingual tailored hearing loss prevention program for Latino construction workers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kerr, Madeleine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Unviversity of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-160 WDH, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-625-2669
Co-Authors:M.J. Kerr, K. Savik, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; L.M. Baer, , Mountain Muse Communications, Denver, CO; E. Halterman, , Spanish in Focus, Denver, CO; O. Hong, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA;
Effective hearing loss prevention is needed for over 2.6 million U.S. Latino construction workers who are exposed to hazardous noise but underserved by existing hearing conservation programs. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the effect of a computer-based bilingual health communication intervention on Latino workers' use of hearing protection. The researchers did formative research to culturally and linguistically adapt their existing educational intervention based on Pender's Health Promotion Model. The study used a randomized controlled trial comparing tailored and targeted versions of the educational program with a follow up survey at 3-6months after the intervention. Construction workers were recruited through their unions to participate in the study. The final pre/post test sample (n=83) was predominantly male (98%) and Latino (76%). Process research to evaluate the acceptability of the intervention to construction workers indicated a positive response. For example, over 90% agreed that the program kept their interest and was an effective way to learn about hearing protection. Significantly more Latinos than non-Latinos said the program was fun (90% vs. 60%), was not too long (93% vs. 54%) and not too slow (88% vs. 27%). Tailored messages were more effective than targeted messages in improving construction workers' hearing health behavior. Participants receiving tailored messages significantly improved use of hearing protection devices (35% to 62%). Tailored messages were effective for both Latinos (p=.026) and non-Latinos (p=.002). Participants receiving targeted messages also improved the use of hearing protection devices from 45% to 56% but the change was not statistically significant (p=.280) for Latinos or non-Latinos. This study established the acceptability and efficacy of the intervention. A multivariate model will be presented to show the influence of model factors on the outcome. Understanding the mechanism of action will assist researchers in planning future intervention research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of a computer-based bilingual tailored hearing loss prevention program for Latino construction workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158374-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Efficacy of a computer-based bilingual tailored hearing loss prevention program for Latino construction workers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kerr, Madeleine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Unviversity of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-160 WDH, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-625-2669</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kerrx010@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.J. Kerr, K. Savik, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; L.M. Baer, , Mountain Muse Communications, Denver, CO; E. Halterman, , Spanish in Focus, Denver, CO; O. Hong, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Effective hearing loss prevention is needed for over 2.6 million U.S. Latino construction workers who are exposed to hazardous noise but underserved by existing hearing conservation programs. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the effect of a computer-based bilingual health communication intervention on Latino workers' use of hearing protection. The researchers did formative research to culturally and linguistically adapt their existing educational intervention based on Pender's Health Promotion Model. The study used a randomized controlled trial comparing tailored and targeted versions of the educational program with a follow up survey at 3-6months after the intervention. Construction workers were recruited through their unions to participate in the study. The final pre/post test sample (n=83) was predominantly male (98%) and Latino (76%). Process research to evaluate the acceptability of the intervention to construction workers indicated a positive response. For example, over 90% agreed that the program kept their interest and was an effective way to learn about hearing protection. Significantly more Latinos than non-Latinos said the program was fun (90% vs. 60%), was not too long (93% vs. 54%) and not too slow (88% vs. 27%). Tailored messages were more effective than targeted messages in improving construction workers' hearing health behavior. Participants receiving tailored messages significantly improved use of hearing protection devices (35% to 62%). Tailored messages were effective for both Latinos (p=.026) and non-Latinos (p=.002). Participants receiving targeted messages also improved the use of hearing protection devices from 45% to 56% but the change was not statistically significant (p=.280) for Latinos or non-Latinos. This study established the acceptability and efficacy of the intervention. A multivariate model will be presented to show the influence of model factors on the outcome. Understanding the mechanism of action will assist researchers in planning future intervention research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:59:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:59:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.