Perceived Social Support and Health Outcomes of Heart Failure Patients with Device Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158375
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Social Support and Health Outcomes of Heart Failure Patients with Device Therapy
Abstract:
Perceived Social Support and Health Outcomes of Heart Failure Patients with Device Therapy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kim, JinShil
P.I. Institution Name:MSU College of Nursing
Contact Address:415A West Fee, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:517-432-8356
Co-Authors:J. Kim, Y. Xie, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; S.J. Pressler, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor , MI; S.B. Dunbar, School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta , GA; S. Heo, School of Nursing, Indiana U
Background: Few studies have examined which types of perceived social support are associated with health outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients with devices (cardiac resynchronization therapy [CRT] or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator [ICD]). Purpose: To evaluate the association between the types of perceived social support and health outcomes in HF patients with CRT/CRT-Defibrillator (CRT-D), ICDs only, or no device. Methods: Using a cross-sectional design (N=269, age 61 plus or minus 11.70, 33% female, 77% NYHA class II/III), we compared perceived social support from family, friends, and significant others (subscales of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support) of HF patients with CRT/CRT-D (n=103), ICDs only (n=46), or no device (n=107). General linear models were used to evaluate the association between health outcomes (functional status-Duke Activity Status Index; physical and emotional health-related quality of life [HRQL]-subscales of the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire) with the following explanatory factors entered in a hierarchical manner: types of device therapy and perceived social support in the first step followed by anxiety and depressive symptoms, and then age, sex, ejection fraction, comorbidity, and inflammatory biomarkers last into the models. Results: Patients in each group received moderately high levels of perceived social support from family, friends, and significant others (Ms=5.6, 5.6, and 5.9 respectively). No significant differences in the types of perceived social support among three groups were observed. The CRT/CRT-D and perceived social support from family were significantly associated with respectively poorer emotional HRQL (p=0.002); and greater functional status (p=0.04) and physical HRQL (p=0.03). The models significantly explained 36%, 46%, and 71% of the variance in functional status and physical and emotional HRQL, respectively. Conclusion: Perceived social support from family is a critical factor for greater physical HRQL in HF patients. Further evaluation is needed whether family support improves emotional HRQL in patients with CRT/CRT-D.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Social Support and Health Outcomes of Heart Failure Patients with Device Therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158375-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived Social Support and Health Outcomes of Heart Failure Patients with Device Therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, JinShil</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">MSU College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">415A West Fee, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517-432-8356</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jinshil.kim@hc.msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Kim, Y. Xie, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; S.J. Pressler, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor , MI; S.B. Dunbar, School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta , GA; S. Heo, School of Nursing, Indiana U</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Few studies have examined which types of perceived social support are associated with health outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients with devices (cardiac resynchronization therapy [CRT] or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator [ICD]). Purpose: To evaluate the association between the types of perceived social support and health outcomes in HF patients with CRT/CRT-Defibrillator (CRT-D), ICDs only, or no device. Methods: Using a cross-sectional design (N=269, age 61 plus or minus 11.70, 33% female, 77% NYHA class II/III), we compared perceived social support from family, friends, and significant others (subscales of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support) of HF patients with CRT/CRT-D (n=103), ICDs only (n=46), or no device (n=107). General linear models were used to evaluate the association between health outcomes (functional status-Duke Activity Status Index; physical and emotional health-related quality of life [HRQL]-subscales of the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire) with the following explanatory factors entered in a hierarchical manner: types of device therapy and perceived social support in the first step followed by anxiety and depressive symptoms, and then age, sex, ejection fraction, comorbidity, and inflammatory biomarkers last into the models. Results: Patients in each group received moderately high levels of perceived social support from family, friends, and significant others (Ms=5.6, 5.6, and 5.9 respectively). No significant differences in the types of perceived social support among three groups were observed. The CRT/CRT-D and perceived social support from family were significantly associated with respectively poorer emotional HRQL (p=0.002); and greater functional status (p=0.04) and physical HRQL (p=0.03). The models significantly explained 36%, 46%, and 71% of the variance in functional status and physical and emotional HRQL, respectively. Conclusion: Perceived social support from family is a critical factor for greater physical HRQL in HF patients. Further evaluation is needed whether family support improves emotional HRQL in patients with CRT/CRT-D.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:59:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:59:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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