Functional Decline in Hospitalized Patients: How Nurses Think about Getting a Patient Moving

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158376
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Functional Decline in Hospitalized Patients: How Nurses Think about Getting a Patient Moving
Abstract:
Functional Decline in Hospitalized Patients: How Nurses Think about Getting a Patient Moving
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:King, Barbara, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin- Madison
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:K6/117 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:920-285-8644
Co-Authors:B.J. King, B.J. Bowers, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin- Madison, Madison, WI;
Functional decline, a loss in ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), occurs in 25 -50% of hospitalized older adults. Nurses have the greatest potential to reverse the loss of function. However, little is known about how nurses identify functional ability in hospitalized older adults, what barriers they face, and how nursing care impacts function. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how nurses think about function and what affect this has on the care they provide. Subjects: 17 registered nurses were interviewed. Methods: Grounded theory was used. In- depth interviews were conducted. Initial questions were open, becoming more focused as analysis proceeded. Constant comparative analysis was used to identify core categories, dimensions and influencing conditions. Results: When nurses discussed functional ability they focused on mobility. The study focused on how RNs conceptualized mobility and what impact this had on care related to functional decline. For RNs, mobilizing the patient involved either, moving the patient in bed, getting the patient up, or ambulating. Categories developed include, purpose for mobilizing the patient, patient characteristics, nurse characteristics, and organizational characteristics. Interaction among these categories produces an assessment in which the nurse identifies safety concerns and opportunity. This assessment impacts whether or not the nurse will move the patient in bed, get the patient up, or ambulate. The level of mobility the nurse pursues has an impact on the patient's functional status. Conclusion: Deciding to mobilize patients is a complex process. Nurse's confidence about their ability to move patients, having nursing assistance to delegate to, and a unit expectation to get patients up had an impact on whether or not nurses would mobilize patients. Future intervention studies that are based on the nurses' reality should be pursued.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFunctional Decline in Hospitalized Patients: How Nurses Think about Getting a Patient Movingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158376-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Functional Decline in Hospitalized Patients: How Nurses Think about Getting a Patient Moving</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">King, Barbara, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin- Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">K6/117 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">920-285-8644</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bjking2@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.J. King, B.J. Bowers, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin- Madison, Madison, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Functional decline, a loss in ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), occurs in 25 -50% of hospitalized older adults. Nurses have the greatest potential to reverse the loss of function. However, little is known about how nurses identify functional ability in hospitalized older adults, what barriers they face, and how nursing care impacts function. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how nurses think about function and what affect this has on the care they provide. Subjects: 17 registered nurses were interviewed. Methods: Grounded theory was used. In- depth interviews were conducted. Initial questions were open, becoming more focused as analysis proceeded. Constant comparative analysis was used to identify core categories, dimensions and influencing conditions. Results: When nurses discussed functional ability they focused on mobility. The study focused on how RNs conceptualized mobility and what impact this had on care related to functional decline. For RNs, mobilizing the patient involved either, moving the patient in bed, getting the patient up, or ambulating. Categories developed include, purpose for mobilizing the patient, patient characteristics, nurse characteristics, and organizational characteristics. Interaction among these categories produces an assessment in which the nurse identifies safety concerns and opportunity. This assessment impacts whether or not the nurse will move the patient in bed, get the patient up, or ambulate. The level of mobility the nurse pursues has an impact on the patient's functional status. Conclusion: Deciding to mobilize patients is a complex process. Nurse's confidence about their ability to move patients, having nursing assistance to delegate to, and a unit expectation to get patients up had an impact on whether or not nurses would mobilize patients. Future intervention studies that are based on the nurses' reality should be pursued.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:59:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:59:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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