2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158377
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Ethic of Care in a Nursing Classroom: A Critical Qualitative Perspective
Abstract:
The Ethic of Care in a Nursing Classroom: A Critical Qualitative Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Leslie, Jamie, MA, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Health Systems Science
Contact Address:1041 Delta Avenue #202, Cincinnati, OH, 45208, USA
Contact Telephone:513-321-4076
Co-Authors:J.L. Leslie, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Nursing claims to be a caring profession, however, students report experiences of anxiety and depression as a result of entering nursing school. The purpose of this study was to understand how a few students and faculty at one large, public, research intensive university interpreted the ethic of care in a first semester required course. A critical qualitative research design based on the conceptual framework for ethic of care was implemented to address the complexity of practicing an ethic of care in a required class of a traditional baccalaureate nursing program. Weekly formal observations of one required nursing course, informal field observations, and interviews with the professor and five students were conducted during the fall 2008. Data were analyzed using line-by-line coding and thematic coding. Antecedents and attributes for the ethic of care were lacking as students and faculty expressed insufficient time to present and learn required material; participants demonstrated a lack of engagement in classroom activity; efficiency and objectivity were emphasized to the detriment of developing relationships and sharing debate, critique, and subjective experiences in class. Participants in this course were challenged to practice an ethic of care by the culture of the nursing program and community to favor objectivity and efficiency over values such as relationships and self-care. Smaller class sizes or more frequent discussion groups may have provided the supportive environment needed for both students and faculty to practice the attributes of the ethic of care: (1) developing relationships with students, (2) acknowledging context, (3) living one's values, (4) demonstrating a caring intention, and (5) practicing ethical action.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Ethic of Care in a Nursing Classroom: A Critical Qualitative Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158377-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Ethic of Care in a Nursing Classroom: A Critical Qualitative Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leslie, Jamie, MA, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Health Systems Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1041 Delta Avenue #202, Cincinnati, OH, 45208, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-321-4076</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jleslie@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.L. Leslie, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing claims to be a caring profession, however, students report experiences of anxiety and depression as a result of entering nursing school. The purpose of this study was to understand how a few students and faculty at one large, public, research intensive university interpreted the ethic of care in a first semester required course. A critical qualitative research design based on the conceptual framework for ethic of care was implemented to address the complexity of practicing an ethic of care in a required class of a traditional baccalaureate nursing program. Weekly formal observations of one required nursing course, informal field observations, and interviews with the professor and five students were conducted during the fall 2008. Data were analyzed using line-by-line coding and thematic coding. Antecedents and attributes for the ethic of care were lacking as students and faculty expressed insufficient time to present and learn required material; participants demonstrated a lack of engagement in classroom activity; efficiency and objectivity were emphasized to the detriment of developing relationships and sharing debate, critique, and subjective experiences in class. Participants in this course were challenged to practice an ethic of care by the culture of the nursing program and community to favor objectivity and efficiency over values such as relationships and self-care. Smaller class sizes or more frequent discussion groups may have provided the supportive environment needed for both students and faculty to practice the attributes of the ethic of care: (1) developing relationships with students, (2) acknowledging context, (3) living one's values, (4) demonstrating a caring intention, and (5) practicing ethical action.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:59:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:59:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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