2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158379
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace Culture and Critical Thinking
Abstract:
Workplace Culture and Critical Thinking
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lockwood, Barbara, PhD, Nursing Research
P.I. Institution Name:Aurora University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:347 S Gladstone Ave, Aurora, IL, 60504, USA
Contact Telephone:630 844 5139
Co-Authors:B.J. Lockwood, School of Nursing, Aurora University, Aurora, IL; B. Dancy, J. Storfjell, A. Gallo, B. Brooks, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; F. Hicks, College of Nursing, Rush University , Chicago, IL;
An ethnographic case study design was used to describe the workplace cultural influences on the quality of critical thinking in medical-surgical nurses working in a non-Magnet community acute care hospital. A conceptual framework was developed from the literature and the researcher's professional experience to identify potential cultural elements that influence the quality of critical thinking. Organizational and unit based management, workplace systems and processes, and workplace relationships, including unit staff nurses, physician and interdepartmental relationships were explored. Twenty RNs from two different medical-surgical units in one acute care hospital were observed while working and were interviewed to determine the quality of the RNs' critical thinking, the nature of workplace culture, and to identify how the culture influenced the RNs' quality of critical thinking. The RNs quality of critical thinking was most influenced by what management emphasized and reinforced and by the absence of two way dialogue between the staff and management. Given the limited emphasis on clinical excellence, the nurses relied heavily on experienced practitioners to make clinical decisions. They created a culture in which harmonious relationships and peer support was paramount. This culture assured that the best clinical decisions were made in the absence of clinical guidelines and defined standards for practice. Negative physician relationships affected the quality of the RNs' critical thinking by causing the RNs to discontinue their thinking, because they were not heard or they were embarrassed. The RNs believed that the patient's condition and their nursing peers had the most profound influence on the quality of their critical thinking yet it was evident that management had the greatest influence. Nursing leadership must assure the needs of the patients served are adequately represented by focusing on clinical excellence, evidence-based practice and improved patient outcomes. A hospital culture must encourage two way dialogue, questioning of the status quo, tolerance for disagreement, on-going learning and the expressed desire for improved critical thinking and clinical decision-making.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorkplace Culture and Critical Thinkingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158379-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Workplace Culture and Critical Thinking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lockwood, Barbara, PhD, Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Aurora University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">347 S Gladstone Ave, Aurora, IL, 60504, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">630 844 5139</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lockwood@aurora.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.J. Lockwood, School of Nursing, Aurora University, Aurora, IL; B. Dancy, J. Storfjell, A. Gallo, B. Brooks, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; F. Hicks, College of Nursing, Rush University , Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">An ethnographic case study design was used to describe the workplace cultural influences on the quality of critical thinking in medical-surgical nurses working in a non-Magnet community acute care hospital. A conceptual framework was developed from the literature and the researcher's professional experience to identify potential cultural elements that influence the quality of critical thinking. Organizational and unit based management, workplace systems and processes, and workplace relationships, including unit staff nurses, physician and interdepartmental relationships were explored. Twenty RNs from two different medical-surgical units in one acute care hospital were observed while working and were interviewed to determine the quality of the RNs' critical thinking, the nature of workplace culture, and to identify how the culture influenced the RNs' quality of critical thinking. The RNs quality of critical thinking was most influenced by what management emphasized and reinforced and by the absence of two way dialogue between the staff and management. Given the limited emphasis on clinical excellence, the nurses relied heavily on experienced practitioners to make clinical decisions. They created a culture in which harmonious relationships and peer support was paramount. This culture assured that the best clinical decisions were made in the absence of clinical guidelines and defined standards for practice. Negative physician relationships affected the quality of the RNs' critical thinking by causing the RNs to discontinue their thinking, because they were not heard or they were embarrassed. The RNs believed that the patient's condition and their nursing peers had the most profound influence on the quality of their critical thinking yet it was evident that management had the greatest influence. Nursing leadership must assure the needs of the patients served are adequately represented by focusing on clinical excellence, evidence-based practice and improved patient outcomes. A hospital culture must encourage two way dialogue, questioning of the status quo, tolerance for disagreement, on-going learning and the expressed desire for improved critical thinking and clinical decision-making.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:59:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:59:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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