2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158381
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Cultural Competence Among Registered Nurses
Abstract:
Predictors of Cultural Competence Among Registered Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:McLennon, Susan, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:1111 Middle Dr., Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317-278-0459
Co-Authors:S.M. McLennon, Nursing, Indiana University, Indianpolis, IN;
Because greater cultural diversity among nursing staff and patient populations has occurred due to recruitment of foreign educated nurses and immigration, it is becoming increasingly important for health care personnel to demonstrate cultural competence. According to the Cultural Competence Model described by Schim and colleagues (2003), cultural competence is comprised of awareness and sensitivity, diversity experiences, and behaviors. To develop an effective training plan, knowledge about factors that predict cultural competence is needed. Purpose: Predictors of cultural competence among registered nurses in a hospital were examined to identify key factors to guide the development of a diversity training program. Methods: An anonymous survey containing the 33-item Cultural Competence Assessment tool was voluntarily completed by 74 registered nurses from selected medical-surgical nursing floors in a large, south-eastern teaching hospital. Surveys contained a cover sheet explaining the purpose, risks, benefits, anonymity, and contact information, and nurses were awarded a gift card upon completion. Sample: Mean age = 40.5 years (r = 23-67 years), 75% = bachelor's degree or higher, white/Caucasian = 61%, Asian = 17%, other = 11%, black/African American = 8%, Hispanic = 3%. Findings: Age, race, years of education, and experience with diverse groups were not predictive. 42% of the nurses reported they had received 2 or more different types of diversity training. Nurses who reported more diversity training (sum of different types) were more culturally competent. Different types of training included employer-sponsored programs (59%), college courses (28%), continuing education (10%), on-line training (9%), and other types (7%). Discussion: These results contribute unique information to the current diversity literature that it is not diversity training per se that effects greater competence, rather it may be a reflection of an accumulation of different types of training.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Cultural Competence Among Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158381-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Cultural Competence Among Registered Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McLennon, Susan, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1111 Middle Dr., Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-278-0459</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smclenno@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.M. McLennon, Nursing, Indiana University, Indianpolis, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Because greater cultural diversity among nursing staff and patient populations has occurred due to recruitment of foreign educated nurses and immigration, it is becoming increasingly important for health care personnel to demonstrate cultural competence. According to the Cultural Competence Model described by Schim and colleagues (2003), cultural competence is comprised of awareness and sensitivity, diversity experiences, and behaviors. To develop an effective training plan, knowledge about factors that predict cultural competence is needed. Purpose: Predictors of cultural competence among registered nurses in a hospital were examined to identify key factors to guide the development of a diversity training program. Methods: An anonymous survey containing the 33-item Cultural Competence Assessment tool was voluntarily completed by 74 registered nurses from selected medical-surgical nursing floors in a large, south-eastern teaching hospital. Surveys contained a cover sheet explaining the purpose, risks, benefits, anonymity, and contact information, and nurses were awarded a gift card upon completion. Sample: Mean age = 40.5 years (r = 23-67 years), 75% = bachelor's degree or higher, white/Caucasian = 61%, Asian = 17%, other = 11%, black/African American = 8%, Hispanic = 3%. Findings: Age, race, years of education, and experience with diverse groups were not predictive. 42% of the nurses reported they had received 2 or more different types of diversity training. Nurses who reported more diversity training (sum of different types) were more culturally competent. Different types of training included employer-sponsored programs (59%), college courses (28%), continuing education (10%), on-line training (9%), and other types (7%). Discussion: These results contribute unique information to the current diversity literature that it is not diversity training per se that effects greater competence, rather it may be a reflection of an accumulation of different types of training.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:59:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:59:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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