Can authoritative parenting reduce teen weight: The process of intervention development

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158388
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Can authoritative parenting reduce teen weight: The process of intervention development
Abstract:
Can authoritative parenting reduce teen weight: The process of intervention development
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Riesch, Susan, PhD RN FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:UW-Madison
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-5169
Co-Authors:J. Hertel, M. Lor, S.K. Riesch, A. Lyles, S.M. Sass, Nursing, UW-Madison, Madison, WI; M. Zywicki, Social Work, UW-Madison, Madison, WI; K. Reuter, Nursing, Lancaster Community Hospital, Lancaster, WI; L.J. Sanders, Population Health Sciences, UW-Madison,
The purpose of this paper is to report the acceptability of an intervention targeted toward parents and their overweight youth (aged 12-19) who were seeking treatment for overweight. Content of the intervention is based on the concepts of: (a) parenting styles (Baumrind, 1967; Maccoby & Martin (1983), (b) confidence and self efficacy (Bandura, 1997), and (c) coercive parenting theory (Forgatch & Patterson, 1999). The intervention is designed to be part of a multi-disciplinary approach to the treatment of childhood overweight. The first step in the intervention is the development of awareness of how parents who are authoritative, authoritarian, uninvolved, or permissive would handle issues. Parents listen to scenarios on an iPod at their leisure. The second step is development of parenting efficacy by reading inspirational daily messages meant to bolster parent's confidence. There are 26 daily readings, adapted from For Today from Overeaters Anonymous. The third step is development of the skills of being demanding and responsive. This is the goal of an eleven week Parenting through Change intervention. Parents learn to make appropriate requests and follow through. All examples are devoid of nutrition or exercise topics because they tend to be emotional topics. Participants were 8 diverse parent-youth dyads. Method. Parent-youth dyads attended two separate focus groups to evaluate the content and delivery of the intervention. They listened to the iPod messages, read the daily readings, participated in two abbreviated sessions of the skill building, and rated surveys to measure parenting style. Each activity was rated using paper and pencil instruments. Verbatim comments were audio recorded. Findings and Conclusions. The youth thought their parents could master the content. The parents thought the content was familiar but not typical of their interactions with their youth. Dyads recommended the intervention be included in their clinic treatment plan.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCan authoritative parenting reduce teen weight: The process of intervention developmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158388-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Can authoritative parenting reduce teen weight: The process of intervention development</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riesch, Susan, PhD RN FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UW-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-5169</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skriesch@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Hertel, M. Lor, S.K. Riesch, A. Lyles, S.M. Sass, Nursing, UW-Madison, Madison, WI; M. Zywicki, Social Work, UW-Madison, Madison, WI; K. Reuter, Nursing, Lancaster Community Hospital, Lancaster, WI; L.J. Sanders, Population Health Sciences, UW-Madison,</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this paper is to report the acceptability of an intervention targeted toward parents and their overweight youth (aged 12-19) who were seeking treatment for overweight. Content of the intervention is based on the concepts of: (a) parenting styles (Baumrind, 1967; Maccoby &amp; Martin (1983), (b) confidence and self efficacy (Bandura, 1997), and (c) coercive parenting theory (Forgatch &amp; Patterson, 1999). The intervention is designed to be part of a multi-disciplinary approach to the treatment of childhood overweight. The first step in the intervention is the development of awareness of how parents who are authoritative, authoritarian, uninvolved, or permissive would handle issues. Parents listen to scenarios on an iPod at their leisure. The second step is development of parenting efficacy by reading inspirational daily messages meant to bolster parent's confidence. There are 26 daily readings, adapted from For Today from Overeaters Anonymous. The third step is development of the skills of being demanding and responsive. This is the goal of an eleven week Parenting through Change intervention. Parents learn to make appropriate requests and follow through. All examples are devoid of nutrition or exercise topics because they tend to be emotional topics. Participants were 8 diverse parent-youth dyads. Method. Parent-youth dyads attended two separate focus groups to evaluate the content and delivery of the intervention. They listened to the iPod messages, read the daily readings, participated in two abbreviated sessions of the skill building, and rated surveys to measure parenting style. Each activity was rated using paper and pencil instruments. Verbatim comments were audio recorded. Findings and Conclusions. The youth thought their parents could master the content. The parents thought the content was familiar but not typical of their interactions with their youth. Dyads recommended the intervention be included in their clinic treatment plan.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:00:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:00:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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