2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158390
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Contributing to Obesity Development of AI Children
Abstract:
Factors Contributing to Obesity Development of AI Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Seal, Nuananong, Ph.D., RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Contact Address:725 40th Ave S., C111, Grand Forks, ND, 58201, USA
Contact Telephone:701-777-4544
Co-Authors:N. Seal, , University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; N. Seal, , Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN;
The purpose of this study is to examine the factors contributing to obesity development during infancy of American Indians (AIs). Obesity has quadrupled during the past 25 years among both male and female children and adolescents. AI children and adolescents have a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than other ethnic groups. Obesity is a product of the complex interplay between environment and genetics. The prenatal period has been identified as a potential critical period for the development of obesity that persists into adulthood. Several studies have demonstrated a relationship between prepregnancy BMI, infants' birth weight, and obesity in children and young adults. In addition, influences within the early-life period, including methods of infant feeding and amount of milk intake, are also linked to obesity in later life. Formula feeding has been identified as possibly contributing to rapid growth during infancy. Genetics is also claimed as a key component in obesity development. Recently, genome-wide association studies and subsequent studies have demonstrated a strong association between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs9939609 in FTO gene and obesity. In addition, SNP rs9939609 was associated with body mass index in adult Pima Indians with type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of obesity in AI children continues to rise and is becoming one of the most serious public health problems facing AI children and adolescents, with grave implications for the immediate and long-term health of AI youth. Limited information, however, exists on factors contributing to obesity development in AI children. The findings of this study may provide preliminary insight into the genetic and environmental factors contributing to obesity in AI children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Contributing to Obesity Development of AI Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158390-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Contributing to Obesity Development of AI Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Seal, Nuananong, Ph.D., RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">725 40th Ave S., C111, Grand Forks, ND, 58201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701-777-4544</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lekseal@mail.und.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N. Seal, , University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; N. Seal, , Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study is to examine the factors contributing to obesity development during infancy of American Indians (AIs). Obesity has quadrupled during the past 25 years among both male and female children and adolescents. AI children and adolescents have a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than other ethnic groups. Obesity is a product of the complex interplay between environment and genetics. The prenatal period has been identified as a potential critical period for the development of obesity that persists into adulthood. Several studies have demonstrated a relationship between prepregnancy BMI, infants' birth weight, and obesity in children and young adults. In addition, influences within the early-life period, including methods of infant feeding and amount of milk intake, are also linked to obesity in later life. Formula feeding has been identified as possibly contributing to rapid growth during infancy. Genetics is also claimed as a key component in obesity development. Recently, genome-wide association studies and subsequent studies have demonstrated a strong association between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs9939609 in FTO gene and obesity. In addition, SNP rs9939609 was associated with body mass index in adult Pima Indians with type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of obesity in AI children continues to rise and is becoming one of the most serious public health problems facing AI children and adolescents, with grave implications for the immediate and long-term health of AI youth. Limited information, however, exists on factors contributing to obesity development in AI children. The findings of this study may provide preliminary insight into the genetic and environmental factors contributing to obesity in AI children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:00:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:00:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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