2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158392
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Dating Relationships
Abstract:
Adolescent Dating Relationships
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Sheehan, Denice, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:10358 Hanford Lane, Twinsburg, OH, 44087, USA
Contact Telephone:330 405 6676
Co-Authors:D. Sheehan, C.B. Draucker, D.S. Martsolf, J. Risko, C. Ferguson, C.B. Cook, P. Stephenson, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH; S. Perkins, K. Washington, Center for the Treatment and Study of Traumatic Stress, Summa Health Systems, Akron,
Purpose: In order to understand adolescent dating relationships that turn violent, it is necessary to understand the dynamics of "everyday" adolescent relationships. Dating violence occurs in the context of the everyday dating milieus and may be difficult to distinguish from behaviors considered normal and acceptable by adolescents. The purpose of this study was to describe "everyday" adolescent dating relationships, including how they are defined by teens and what makes them positive or negative. Theoretical/conceptual framework: A developmental perspective was used. In this approach, developing dating relationships in adolescence are the focus of the study. Participants: Data were drawn from 22 transcribed interviews of 18 to 21year old undergraduate nursing students. Methodology: The participants were asked to describe adolescent dating relationships and give examples of good and troubled dating relationships. Data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive methods. In this approach, the facts of the event and the meaning participants ascribe to the facts are conveyed to others as straight descriptions of phenomena. Results: The participants described ambiguity in defining dating relationships. They described good relationships as having open communication, trust, supportive friends, time away from a partner, and positive parental influence. Bad relationships included cheating, jealousy, controlling a partner, and abuse. The participants often described scenarios in "typical" dating relationships that would meet formal definitions of dating violence but which they perceived as normal behavior. Conclusions: Understanding "typical" adolescent dating relationships provides a context within which to help adolescents identify boundaries of acceptable behavior. Lack of clarity in defining dating and in determining what behaviors constitute abuse may provide fertile ground for problematic dating relationships in adolescence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Dating Relationshipsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158392-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent Dating Relationships</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sheehan, Denice, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10358 Hanford Lane, Twinsburg, OH, 44087, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330 405 6676</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dsheeha1@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D. Sheehan, C.B. Draucker, D.S. Martsolf, J. Risko, C. Ferguson, C.B. Cook, P. Stephenson, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH; S. Perkins, K. Washington, Center for the Treatment and Study of Traumatic Stress, Summa Health Systems, Akron,</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: In order to understand adolescent dating relationships that turn violent, it is necessary to understand the dynamics of &quot;everyday&quot; adolescent relationships. Dating violence occurs in the context of the everyday dating milieus and may be difficult to distinguish from behaviors considered normal and acceptable by adolescents. The purpose of this study was to describe &quot;everyday&quot; adolescent dating relationships, including how they are defined by teens and what makes them positive or negative. Theoretical/conceptual framework: A developmental perspective was used. In this approach, developing dating relationships in adolescence are the focus of the study. Participants: Data were drawn from 22 transcribed interviews of 18 to 21year old undergraduate nursing students. Methodology: The participants were asked to describe adolescent dating relationships and give examples of good and troubled dating relationships. Data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive methods. In this approach, the facts of the event and the meaning participants ascribe to the facts are conveyed to others as straight descriptions of phenomena. Results: The participants described ambiguity in defining dating relationships. They described good relationships as having open communication, trust, supportive friends, time away from a partner, and positive parental influence. Bad relationships included cheating, jealousy, controlling a partner, and abuse. The participants often described scenarios in &quot;typical&quot; dating relationships that would meet formal definitions of dating violence but which they perceived as normal behavior. Conclusions: Understanding &quot;typical&quot; adolescent dating relationships provides a context within which to help adolescents identify boundaries of acceptable behavior. Lack of clarity in defining dating and in determining what behaviors constitute abuse may provide fertile ground for problematic dating relationships in adolescence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:00:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:00:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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