2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158393
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acculturation, Health, and Healthy Eating: Cluster Analysis Approach
Abstract:
Acculturation, Health, and Healthy Eating: Cluster Analysis Approach
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Shin, Cha-Nam, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:749 Chestnut St., Terre Haute, IN, 47809, USA
Contact Telephone:812-237-3682
Co-Authors:C. Shin, College of Nursing, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN;
Problem: Health disparities are a significant problem among immigrant populations, making acculturation an important concept to measure in research. Yet little study is done to measure and analyze acculturation in Korean Americans, based on an appropriate theoretical framework. Purpose: This study examined the level of acculturation of Korean American adults in order to identify population at risk of poor health and eating habits. Theoretical Framework: Berry's Bidimensional Acculturation Framework and Pender's Health Promotion Model. Subjects: Participants were 517 Korean American adults in a Midwestern city, who completed the survey in English (n=261) or Korean (n=256) as their preferences. Methodology: A mailed survey measured health, acculturation, benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy for healthy eating, and self-reported eating patterns. Descriptive statistics and K-means cluster method were used for data analysis. Results: The sample was 57.1% female with a mean age of 41.6 plus or minus 13.40. The findings revealed significant differences in characteristics between two samples: individuals who completed the English survey were more likely to be single (chi² = 37.33), younger (t=3.84); overweight/obese (t=8.91), perceive better physical health (t=3.46), have healthy eating habits (t=4.93) than participants in the Korean survey, at p<.01. Also, K-means (k=3) cluster method identified different patterns of acculturation between participants in the English survey (assimilation, integration, and separation) and the Korean survey (integration, separation, and marginalization). Individuals who were marginalized (the least acculturated to the American society) were more likely to perceive poor physical (F=8.42) and mental health (F=3.45), and less benefits for healthy eating (F=5.55) in addition to poor eating habits (F=6.61), at p<.01. Conclusions and Implications: Culturally appropriate interventions should be targeted to Korean American adults who have poor health and eating habits. Further research of acculturation based on theoretical foundation and valid measure is needed to better understand acculturation in health research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcculturation, Health, and Healthy Eating: Cluster Analysis Approachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158393-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Acculturation, Health, and Healthy Eating: Cluster Analysis Approach</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shin, Cha-Nam, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">749 Chestnut St., Terre Haute, IN, 47809, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812-237-3682</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cshin1@indstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Shin, College of Nursing, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Health disparities are a significant problem among immigrant populations, making acculturation an important concept to measure in research. Yet little study is done to measure and analyze acculturation in Korean Americans, based on an appropriate theoretical framework. Purpose: This study examined the level of acculturation of Korean American adults in order to identify population at risk of poor health and eating habits. Theoretical Framework: Berry's Bidimensional Acculturation Framework and Pender's Health Promotion Model. Subjects: Participants were 517 Korean American adults in a Midwestern city, who completed the survey in English (n=261) or Korean (n=256) as their preferences. Methodology: A mailed survey measured health, acculturation, benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy for healthy eating, and self-reported eating patterns. Descriptive statistics and K-means cluster method were used for data analysis. Results: The sample was 57.1% female with a mean age of 41.6 plus or minus 13.40. The findings revealed significant differences in characteristics between two samples: individuals who completed the English survey were more likely to be single (chi&sup2; = 37.33), younger (t=3.84); overweight/obese (t=8.91), perceive better physical health (t=3.46), have healthy eating habits (t=4.93) than participants in the Korean survey, at p&lt;.01. Also, K-means (k=3) cluster method identified different patterns of acculturation between participants in the English survey (assimilation, integration, and separation) and the Korean survey (integration, separation, and marginalization). Individuals who were marginalized (the least acculturated to the American society) were more likely to perceive poor physical (F=8.42) and mental health (F=3.45), and less benefits for healthy eating (F=5.55) in addition to poor eating habits (F=6.61), at p&lt;.01. Conclusions and Implications: Culturally appropriate interventions should be targeted to Korean American adults who have poor health and eating habits. Further research of acculturation based on theoretical foundation and valid measure is needed to better understand acculturation in health research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:00:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:00:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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