2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158394
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chlamydia trachomatis as a possible cause of Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Author(s):
Simonson, Andrea K.; Herrick, L.
Author Details:
A.K. Simonson, BSN, BA, University of Minnesota, School of Nursing, Rochester, MN, 55906, USA email: AKSimonson@gmail.com; L. Herrick, Mayo Clinic, Gastroenterology Research Department, Rochester, MN;
Abstract:
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder that effects 10-15% of the United States population. A significant amount of healthcare resources are used each year for the management of this disorder. There is some understanding of the etiology of IBS, but much is unknown about the pathology of IBS. IBS is predominately diagnosed in women who are between 15 and 44 years of age. Previous research suggests IBS symptoms may associate with to the female hormones and the menstrual cycle; sexual, physical, and emotional abuse; and prior GI infections. A recent study found a significantly higher rate of Chlamydia trachomatis infections in small bowel biopsies of women with IBS than in women without IBS (Dlugosz, et al. 2008). This purpose of this pilot study was to further explore this potential link between Chlamydia trachomatis infections and IBS. Women suffering with IBS symptoms were identified using the Talley Bowel Disease Questionnaire from a large population based survey. These patients (n=190) were then matched by age with a control group (n=101) without IBS symptoms. The medical records of these patients were abstracted to determine if the patient had been diagnosed with a Chlamydia or other sexually transmitted infections (STDs) in the past. The mean age for each group was 47 plus or minus 13 years. Of those with IBS, the majority had IBS with diarrhea (55%). The results of this pilot showed that while nearly 20% of this population had been screened for one or more STDs, no positive results for STDs were found in either those women with or without IBS symptoms. While the results of this pilot were negative, results suggested that a younger group of women might yield a higher percent of screening and chance of positive results though incidence of STDs in the survey population are limited.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
34th Annual MNRS Conference
Conference Host:
Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Kansas City, Missouri, USA
Description:
Conference held April 8 - 11, 2010 at the Westin Crown Center.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChlamydia trachomatis as a possible cause of Irritable Bowel Syndromeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSimonson, Andrea K.e_US
dc.contributor.authorHerrick, L.en_US
dc.author.detailsA.K. Simonson, BSN, BA, University of Minnesota, School of Nursing, Rochester, MN, 55906, USA email: AKSimonson@gmail.com; L. Herrick, Mayo Clinic, Gastroenterology Research Department, Rochester, MN;en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158394-
dc.description.abstractIrritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder that effects 10-15% of the United States population. A significant amount of healthcare resources are used each year for the management of this disorder. There is some understanding of the etiology of IBS, but much is unknown about the pathology of IBS. IBS is predominately diagnosed in women who are between 15 and 44 years of age. Previous research suggests IBS symptoms may associate with to the female hormones and the menstrual cycle; sexual, physical, and emotional abuse; and prior GI infections. A recent study found a significantly higher rate of Chlamydia trachomatis infections in small bowel biopsies of women with IBS than in women without IBS (Dlugosz, et al. 2008). This purpose of this pilot study was to further explore this potential link between Chlamydia trachomatis infections and IBS. Women suffering with IBS symptoms were identified using the Talley Bowel Disease Questionnaire from a large population based survey. These patients (n=190) were then matched by age with a control group (n=101) without IBS symptoms. The medical records of these patients were abstracted to determine if the patient had been diagnosed with a Chlamydia or other sexually transmitted infections (STDs) in the past. The mean age for each group was 47 plus or minus 13 years. Of those with IBS, the majority had IBS with diarrhea (55%). The results of this pilot showed that while nearly 20% of this population had been screened for one or more STDs, no positive results for STDs were found in either those women with or without IBS symptoms. While the results of this pilot were negative, results suggested that a younger group of women might yield a higher percent of screening and chance of positive results though incidence of STDs in the survey population are limited.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:00:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:00:27Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual MNRS Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationKansas City, Missouri, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference held April 8 - 11, 2010 at the Westin Crown Center.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.