2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158395
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Are Restorative Care Programs Underutilized in United States Nursing Homes?
Abstract:
Are Restorative Care Programs Underutilized in United States Nursing Homes?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Talley, Kristine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota, School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-624-9412
Co-Authors:K.M. Talley, C. Mueller, J.F. Wyman, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; R.L. Kane, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
Restorative care, a type of nursing rehabilitation can be used by nursing homes to meet federal mandates to maintain function in elderly long-stay residents. Despite federal reimbursement policies encouraging restorative care, little is known about the scope of these programs. The 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (a nationally representative sample of 13,507 nursing home residents living in 1,174 nursing homes) was used to identify the prevalence of restorative care programs, and nursing home and resident characteristics associated with participation. This study examined elderly long-stay residents (age equal to or greater than 65 years, length of stay equal to or greater than 6 months, not comatose, not hospice). The sample (N=8,183) included mostly white (87%) female (77%) residents (mean age 84.6 plus or minus 8.0, mean length of stay 3.2 plus or minus 3.3 years). Only 67% of nursing homes provided restorative care to 21% of elderly long-stay residents. Multivariate logistic regression models indicated that restorative care participants had fewer years of residency and lived in smaller rural facilities. They were more likely to have experienced a stroke, have greater ADL dependency, walking impairments, bladder incontinence, depressive symptoms, pain, and polypharmacy. Residents with bowel incontinence and increased frailty were less likely to participate. This is the first description of the scope of restorative care practice in the United States. Participation rates are lower than that reported by other countries. Restorative care appears to be underutilized in long-stay residents who could potentially benefit. Future research should examine barriers to restorative care and develop programs for larger facilities and for residents with increased frailty and bowel incontinence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAre Restorative Care Programs Underutilized in United States Nursing Homes?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158395-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Are Restorative Care Programs Underutilized in United States Nursing Homes?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Talley, Kristine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-624-9412</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carl0106@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.M. Talley, C. Mueller, J.F. Wyman, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; R.L. Kane, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Restorative care, a type of nursing rehabilitation can be used by nursing homes to meet federal mandates to maintain function in elderly long-stay residents. Despite federal reimbursement policies encouraging restorative care, little is known about the scope of these programs. The 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (a nationally representative sample of 13,507 nursing home residents living in 1,174 nursing homes) was used to identify the prevalence of restorative care programs, and nursing home and resident characteristics associated with participation. This study examined elderly long-stay residents (age equal to or greater than 65 years, length of stay equal to or greater than 6 months, not comatose, not hospice). The sample (N=8,183) included mostly white (87%) female (77%) residents (mean age 84.6 plus or minus 8.0, mean length of stay 3.2 plus or minus 3.3 years). Only 67% of nursing homes provided restorative care to 21% of elderly long-stay residents. Multivariate logistic regression models indicated that restorative care participants had fewer years of residency and lived in smaller rural facilities. They were more likely to have experienced a stroke, have greater ADL dependency, walking impairments, bladder incontinence, depressive symptoms, pain, and polypharmacy. Residents with bowel incontinence and increased frailty were less likely to participate. This is the first description of the scope of restorative care practice in the United States. Participation rates are lower than that reported by other countries. Restorative care appears to be underutilized in long-stay residents who could potentially benefit. Future research should examine barriers to restorative care and develop programs for larger facilities and for residents with increased frailty and bowel incontinence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:00:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:00:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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