2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158398
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Conditions that Enhance and Hinder Student Guided Reflection during Simulations
Abstract:
Conditions that Enhance and Hinder Student Guided Reflection during Simulations
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Wheeler, Corinne, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University School of Nursing
Title:Environments for Health
Contact Address:1111 Middle Dr., NU460, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317 274 8671
Co-Authors:C.A. Wheeler, A.M. McNelis, Department of Environments for Health, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN; V. Sweitzer, G. Kost, Department of Adult Health, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN;
The body of research related to simulation in the context of health professions education is growing as increasing numbers of schools use simulation technologies in their programs. Much of the research in the area of simulation relates specifically to teaching technical skills, problem solving or crisis interventions in which the emphasis is primarily on the detection and intervention of physiologic changes. Debriefing is an essential component of each simulation scenario and is often referred to as the core element of the simulation (Seropian,2003). Even though the literature claims that debriefing is an important part of the learning process while using simulations, further research is needed to support evidence-based practice. This paper will present the findings of a study that intends to inform nurse educators in the area of debriefing. Using the constructivist theory as the theoretical framework, this research aims to describe students' perceptions of the conditions that enhance guided reflection when simulation is used as a learning experience, and its benefits or risks to students' achievement of learning outcomes. A purposive sample of 200 5th semester BSN nursing students will participate in this study. Following a required simulation in a medical-surgical course, and without their faculty present, students will meet with the investigator in a separate room; and participate in digitally recorded semi-structured interviews. Data will be transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis; a procedure based upon the work of Glaser and Strauss (1967) and Lincoln and Guba (1985) to group and synthesize the responses for discussion and delineation of themes. Trustworthiness of the study will be established by following the quality criteria established by Lincon & Guba (1985). Procedures for Human Subject Protections will be followed and IRB approval obtained. This study will provide a better understanding of how students perceive the conditions that promote or inhibit guided reflection when simulation is used as a learning experience, and on its benefits or risks to their achievement of learning outcomes. The evidence will help faculty create an environment that enhances guided reflection with minimal or no risk to students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConditions that Enhance and Hinder Student Guided Reflection during Simulationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158398-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Conditions that Enhance and Hinder Student Guided Reflection during Simulations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wheeler, Corinne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Environments for Health</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1111 Middle Dr., NU460, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317 274 8671</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cawheele@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.A. Wheeler, A.M. McNelis, Department of Environments for Health, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN; V. Sweitzer, G. Kost, Department of Adult Health, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The body of research related to simulation in the context of health professions education is growing as increasing numbers of schools use simulation technologies in their programs. Much of the research in the area of simulation relates specifically to teaching technical skills, problem solving or crisis interventions in which the emphasis is primarily on the detection and intervention of physiologic changes. Debriefing is an essential component of each simulation scenario and is often referred to as the core element of the simulation (Seropian,2003). Even though the literature claims that debriefing is an important part of the learning process while using simulations, further research is needed to support evidence-based practice. This paper will present the findings of a study that intends to inform nurse educators in the area of debriefing. Using the constructivist theory as the theoretical framework, this research aims to describe students' perceptions of the conditions that enhance guided reflection when simulation is used as a learning experience, and its benefits or risks to students' achievement of learning outcomes. A purposive sample of 200 5th semester BSN nursing students will participate in this study. Following a required simulation in a medical-surgical course, and without their faculty present, students will meet with the investigator in a separate room; and participate in digitally recorded semi-structured interviews. Data will be transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis; a procedure based upon the work of Glaser and Strauss (1967) and Lincoln and Guba (1985) to group and synthesize the responses for discussion and delineation of themes. Trustworthiness of the study will be established by following the quality criteria established by Lincon &amp; Guba (1985). Procedures for Human Subject Protections will be followed and IRB approval obtained. This study will provide a better understanding of how students perceive the conditions that promote or inhibit guided reflection when simulation is used as a learning experience, and on its benefits or risks to their achievement of learning outcomes. The evidence will help faculty create an environment that enhances guided reflection with minimal or no risk to students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:00:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:00:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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