2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158401
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nutrition Patterns in Early Pregnancy
Abstract:
Nutrition Patterns in Early Pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Anderson, Cindy, PhD, WHNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Family and Community Nursing
Contact Address:430 Oxford Street, Room 307, Stop 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202-9025, USA
Contact Telephone:701-777-4354
Co-Authors:C. Lauzon, C. Seames, C.M. Anderson, Family and Community Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND;
Optimal maternal nutrition during pregnancy enhances delivery of essential nutrients to the developing embryo/fetus. Maternal nutrient status may be compromised by nausea and food intolerance often associated with early pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to determine maternal nutritional intake and serum markers of maternal nutrient status during early pregnancy. Barker's developmental origins hypothesis provides the framework for this study and proposes that adult disease results from developmental plasticity, or altered phenotype in response to adverse environmental conditions, induced by fetal undernutrition. While fetal adaptation to poor in-utero nutrition may be initially adaptive, the long-term consequences resulting from the irreversible, permanent metabolic, physiologic and structural alterations contribute to the manifestations of adult disease. In this descriptive study, a convenience sample of nulliparous women at a scheduled visit for prenatal care between 10-12 weeks gestation (n=26) completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire providing data for nutritional intake of macronutrients and micronutrients during the first trimester of pregnancy. In addition, an assessment of vitamin and mineral supplementation was completed. Markers of serum nutrient status were obtained to inform dietary intake. Data are presented as mean + SEM. Analysis of macronutrient intake demonstrated total daily intake of protein (93.62 + 6.48g), carbohydrate (286.7 + 20.5g), and fat (92.35 + 6.95g), with % of total daily intake 16, 50 and 28 respectively. Average daily calorie intake totaled 2365 + 150.1 kcal. Micronutrient intake of calcium (1222 + 96.87mg), phosphorus (1746 + 115.4 mg), magnesium (349.1 + 23.8 mg), iron (19.96 + 1.68 mg), zinc (14.94 + 1.04 mg), and copper (1.47 + 0.11 mg) were consistent with RDA during pregnancy. Serum levels of related micronutrients reflect intake assessment findings. Findings suggest that among women seeking prenatal care during the first trimester of pregnancy, maternal nutrient status reflects a diet expected to meet nutritional needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNutrition Patterns in Early Pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158401-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nutrition Patterns in Early Pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Cindy, PhD, WHNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Family and Community Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">430 Oxford Street, Room 307, Stop 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202-9025, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701-777-4354</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cindyanderson@mail.und.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Lauzon, C. Seames, C.M. Anderson, Family and Community Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Optimal maternal nutrition during pregnancy enhances delivery of essential nutrients to the developing embryo/fetus. Maternal nutrient status may be compromised by nausea and food intolerance often associated with early pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to determine maternal nutritional intake and serum markers of maternal nutrient status during early pregnancy. Barker's developmental origins hypothesis provides the framework for this study and proposes that adult disease results from developmental plasticity, or altered phenotype in response to adverse environmental conditions, induced by fetal undernutrition. While fetal adaptation to poor in-utero nutrition may be initially adaptive, the long-term consequences resulting from the irreversible, permanent metabolic, physiologic and structural alterations contribute to the manifestations of adult disease. In this descriptive study, a convenience sample of nulliparous women at a scheduled visit for prenatal care between 10-12 weeks gestation (n=26) completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire providing data for nutritional intake of macronutrients and micronutrients during the first trimester of pregnancy. In addition, an assessment of vitamin and mineral supplementation was completed. Markers of serum nutrient status were obtained to inform dietary intake. Data are presented as mean + SEM. Analysis of macronutrient intake demonstrated total daily intake of protein (93.62 + 6.48g), carbohydrate (286.7 + 20.5g), and fat (92.35 + 6.95g), with % of total daily intake 16, 50 and 28 respectively. Average daily calorie intake totaled 2365 + 150.1 kcal. Micronutrient intake of calcium (1222 + 96.87mg), phosphorus (1746 + 115.4 mg), magnesium (349.1 + 23.8 mg), iron (19.96 + 1.68 mg), zinc (14.94 + 1.04 mg), and copper (1.47 + 0.11 mg) were consistent with RDA during pregnancy. Serum levels of related micronutrients reflect intake assessment findings. Findings suggest that among women seeking prenatal care during the first trimester of pregnancy, maternal nutrient status reflects a diet expected to meet nutritional needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:00:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:00:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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