Outcomes of Mentoring: An Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties and Relationship to Antecedent and Causal Factors.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158402
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of Mentoring: An Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties and Relationship to Antecedent and Causal Factors.
Abstract:
Outcomes of Mentoring: An Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties and Relationship to Antecedent and Causal Factors.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Anthony, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:113 Henderson Hall, P.O Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8824
Co-Authors:M.K. Anthony, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH; J.M. Clochesy, School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
Background: Nurse shortages have brought to the forefront an emerging interest in mentoring programs as one way for new nurses to become socialized into the profession. However, the outcomes of mentoring are empirically ill defined and their association to satisfaction not well tested. Purpose: To explore initial psychometric evidence of Fowler's scale (2005) describing positive outcomes (benefits) of early mentoring and to assess the congruence between actual occurrence of mentoring outcomes and how beneficial that outcome has been, the fit of the mentor to outcomes and mentoring outcomes to work satisfaction at 3 and 6 months of employment. Conceptual Framework: Kram's stages of mentoring relationships were used: initiation, cultivation, separation, and redefinition. Design: A descriptive correlational study of RNs in a 25 week mentored orientation. Method: 58 RNs, new to one of 4 ICUs at a university hospital, were assigned a RN mentor. Fowler's 29 item positive outcomes of mentoring instrument was administered at 3 and 6 months evaluating the occurrence of positive outcomes of mentoring and how beneficial the outcome was to the new nurse. Results: An exploratory factor analysis of the outcome scale suggested 5 factors accounting for 78.3% of the variance. Cronbach alpha for each of the five factors was acceptable. At 3 and 6 months, the extent the outcome was beneficial to the nurse was generally perceived to be greater than the extent the outcome actually occurred. Positive correlations were found suggesting that the outcomes of mentoring were associated with the "fit with the mentor". Positive correlations were also found between the outcome factors and McCloskey-Mueller dimensions of satisfaction such as praise, coworker, and interaction. Implications: Although the sample size was small, the factors were empirically and theoretically strong. Mentoring is a complex process in which the mentoring relationship develops over time and function. In the early phase while nurses are developing realistic expectations, mentors affect how nurses perceive the outcomes of mentoring and their satisfaction. Funded by Department of Health & Human Services: Nurse Education, Practice, and Retention Grant Program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of Mentoring: An Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties and Relationship to Antecedent and Causal Factors.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158402-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes of Mentoring: An Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties and Relationship to Antecedent and Causal Factors.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anthony, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">113 Henderson Hall, P.O Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8824</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">manthony@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.K. Anthony, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH; J.M. Clochesy, School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Nurse shortages have brought to the forefront an emerging interest in mentoring programs as one way for new nurses to become socialized into the profession. However, the outcomes of mentoring are empirically ill defined and their association to satisfaction not well tested. Purpose: To explore initial psychometric evidence of Fowler's scale (2005) describing positive outcomes (benefits) of early mentoring and to assess the congruence between actual occurrence of mentoring outcomes and how beneficial that outcome has been, the fit of the mentor to outcomes and mentoring outcomes to work satisfaction at 3 and 6 months of employment. Conceptual Framework: Kram's stages of mentoring relationships were used: initiation, cultivation, separation, and redefinition. Design: A descriptive correlational study of RNs in a 25 week mentored orientation. Method: 58 RNs, new to one of 4 ICUs at a university hospital, were assigned a RN mentor. Fowler's 29 item positive outcomes of mentoring instrument was administered at 3 and 6 months evaluating the occurrence of positive outcomes of mentoring and how beneficial the outcome was to the new nurse. Results: An exploratory factor analysis of the outcome scale suggested 5 factors accounting for 78.3% of the variance. Cronbach alpha for each of the five factors was acceptable. At 3 and 6 months, the extent the outcome was beneficial to the nurse was generally perceived to be greater than the extent the outcome actually occurred. Positive correlations were found suggesting that the outcomes of mentoring were associated with the &quot;fit with the mentor&quot;. Positive correlations were also found between the outcome factors and McCloskey-Mueller dimensions of satisfaction such as praise, coworker, and interaction. Implications: Although the sample size was small, the factors were empirically and theoretically strong. Mentoring is a complex process in which the mentoring relationship develops over time and function. In the early phase while nurses are developing realistic expectations, mentors affect how nurses perceive the outcomes of mentoring and their satisfaction. Funded by Department of Health &amp; Human Services: Nurse Education, Practice, and Retention Grant Program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:00:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:00:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.