2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158403
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Contextual Factors in Transition to Adulthood: Ableism and Cerebral Palsy
Abstract:
Contextual Factors in Transition to Adulthood: Ableism and Cerebral Palsy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ayres, Lioness, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-6624
Co-Authors:L. Ayres, M. Lehan Mackin, A. Oldenburg, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Transition from adolescence to adulthood is a critical developmental passage in the lives of all young people but especially for those with impaired mobility. Contemporary young adults with mobility disorders are members of the first generation in which 90% or more of children born with severe disabilities survive to adulthood. Similarly, advances in trauma care have saved the lives of children with severe injuries, leaving them with residual functional limitations. Unfortunately, functional limitations in breathing, speech, or travel make traditional, face-to-face interviews overwhelmingly burdensome, such that they are essentially locked out of the research process. This systematic undersampling of the population undermines both the internal and external validity of research on persons with disabilities; in addition, research that is inaccessible to persons with disabilities further disadvantages an already marginalized group. To prevent their underrepresentation, we designed a web-based message board, to collect interview data asynchronously over the Internet. The conceptual underpinning of this study was the World Health Organization's International Classification of Function (ICF). The purpose of the paper presented here is to describe experiences of ableism by four adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Ableism, defined here as simultaneous devaluing of persons with disabilities and the privileging of persons without them. The ICF recognizes two groups of contextual factors, external and personal, that influence the participation of persons with disabilities in society. For this paper, we used close reading of four interviews with men and women with CP to explore their experiences of ableism. We identify barriers to successful transition from both external and internalized ableism and describe some strategies young adults with CP have used to manage ableism in themselves and others.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleContextual Factors in Transition to Adulthood: Ableism and Cerebral Palsyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158403-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Contextual Factors in Transition to Adulthood: Ableism and Cerebral Palsy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ayres, Lioness, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-6624</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lioness-ayres@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L. Ayres, M. Lehan Mackin, A. Oldenburg, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Transition from adolescence to adulthood is a critical developmental passage in the lives of all young people but especially for those with impaired mobility. Contemporary young adults with mobility disorders are members of the first generation in which 90% or more of children born with severe disabilities survive to adulthood. Similarly, advances in trauma care have saved the lives of children with severe injuries, leaving them with residual functional limitations. Unfortunately, functional limitations in breathing, speech, or travel make traditional, face-to-face interviews overwhelmingly burdensome, such that they are essentially locked out of the research process. This systematic undersampling of the population undermines both the internal and external validity of research on persons with disabilities; in addition, research that is inaccessible to persons with disabilities further disadvantages an already marginalized group. To prevent their underrepresentation, we designed a web-based message board, to collect interview data asynchronously over the Internet. The conceptual underpinning of this study was the World Health Organization's International Classification of Function (ICF). The purpose of the paper presented here is to describe experiences of ableism by four adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Ableism, defined here as simultaneous devaluing of persons with disabilities and the privileging of persons without them. The ICF recognizes two groups of contextual factors, external and personal, that influence the participation of persons with disabilities in society. For this paper, we used close reading of four interviews with men and women with CP to explore their experiences of ableism. We identify barriers to successful transition from both external and internalized ableism and describe some strategies young adults with CP have used to manage ableism in themselves and others.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:01:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:01:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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