Pocket PC and Simulation Partner to Enhance Safe and Effective Medication Administration

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158405
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pocket PC and Simulation Partner to Enhance Safe and Effective Medication Administration
Abstract:
Pocket PC and Simulation Partner to Enhance Safe and Effective Medication Administration
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Chang, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:502 North University Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-2069, USA
Contact Telephone:7654963086
Co-Authors:K. Chang, J. Kirkpatrick, M. Criswell, School of Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN;
Background: To emphasize safe practice and decision-making in medication administration for nursing students, the Pocket PC was paired with a high-fidelity simulator (Sim Man) prior to students' first clinical experience administering medications. The simulator was placed in a private hospital room, with a barcode medication administration system. Students used the Pocket PC to learn about medications. They then verbalized key medication information to the faculty member, made decisions about medication safety, and administered medications to Sim Man. Objective: We examined the effectiveness of the simulated experience from students' and faculty members' perspectives on subsequent medication administration during clinical practice. Method: An exploratory descriptive design was used. Participants were 17 nursing students and two faculty members in a 4-week intensive fundamental clinical course (summer 2008). Open-ended questions were used at the beginning of the study to assess students' baseline knowledge of medication administration and at the end of the study to assess student and faculty perceptions of the simulated experience. Content analysis was used to identify common themes of comments. Results: Students reported that the simulated experience increased their confidence in both medication administration as well as interactions with faculty. They appreciated quick access of information in the Pocket PC and used this information to provide patient education and a holistic approach to medication administration. Faculty stated that students were less apprehensive with medication administration and used critical thinking skills instead of focusing on the task of medication administration. Both students and faculty expressed interest in more simulated experiences. Conclusions: This teaching strategy improved students' critical thinking skills and prepared them for actual medication experiences in the hospital setting. This simulated environment model, focusing on decision-making about safe and effective medication administration, can be used to prevent and reduce high-risk or high-volume medication errors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePocket PC and Simulation Partner to Enhance Safe and Effective Medication Administrationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158405-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pocket PC and Simulation Partner to Enhance Safe and Effective Medication Administration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chang, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">502 North University Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-2069, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">7654963086</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ckchang@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Chang, J. Kirkpatrick, M. Criswell, School of Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: To emphasize safe practice and decision-making in medication administration for nursing students, the Pocket PC was paired with a high-fidelity simulator (Sim Man) prior to students' first clinical experience administering medications. The simulator was placed in a private hospital room, with a barcode medication administration system. Students used the Pocket PC to learn about medications. They then verbalized key medication information to the faculty member, made decisions about medication safety, and administered medications to Sim Man. Objective: We examined the effectiveness of the simulated experience from students' and faculty members' perspectives on subsequent medication administration during clinical practice. Method: An exploratory descriptive design was used. Participants were 17 nursing students and two faculty members in a 4-week intensive fundamental clinical course (summer 2008). Open-ended questions were used at the beginning of the study to assess students' baseline knowledge of medication administration and at the end of the study to assess student and faculty perceptions of the simulated experience. Content analysis was used to identify common themes of comments. Results: Students reported that the simulated experience increased their confidence in both medication administration as well as interactions with faculty. They appreciated quick access of information in the Pocket PC and used this information to provide patient education and a holistic approach to medication administration. Faculty stated that students were less apprehensive with medication administration and used critical thinking skills instead of focusing on the task of medication administration. Both students and faculty expressed interest in more simulated experiences. Conclusions: This teaching strategy improved students' critical thinking skills and prepared them for actual medication experiences in the hospital setting. This simulated environment model, focusing on decision-making about safe and effective medication administration, can be used to prevent and reduce high-risk or high-volume medication errors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:01:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:01:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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