2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158409
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Talking about Patients: Nurses' Language Use During Hand-Offs
Abstract:
Talking about Patients: Nurses' Language Use During Hand-Offs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ford, Yvonne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Western Michigan University
Title:Bronson School of Nursing
Contact Address:1848 Plateau Dr SW, Wyoming, MI, 49519, USA
Contact Telephone:616-538-9319
Co-Authors:Y. Ford, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;
Hand-offs, the transition of responsibility for patient care from one provider to another, have recently come under scrutiny by regulatory agencies and researchers. Nurses hand-off the care of patients at the end of every shift, as well as when patients move from one healthcare setting to another. Research to date on hand-offs has focused on the functions that hand-offs serve for the nurses who participate in them, to the exclusion of the language used to transmit information. Genre theory, a linguistic theory, illustrates the relationships between language and the context within which it is used. This descriptive study of forty-three end-of-shift hand-offs examined the use of language by nurses during hand-offs using the linguistic approaches of genre analysis and corpus analysis. Genre analysis, a form of discourse analysis based on genre theory, was used to identify the move structure of the hand-offs. Four moves were consistently used by nurses to transmit patient information: Introducing the Patient; Summarizing the Shift's Events; Looking Ahead; and Wrapping Up. Corpus analysis, an electronic method of analyzing large bodies of text, was then used to identify the patterns of the language used by nurses in hand-offs, including the use of linguistic features such as parts of speech, grammatical structures, and phrases within the hand-offs. This description of the text of nursing hand-offs adds to what is already known about hand-offs with specific information about the language patterns that nurses use to relay information about patients' conditions and care. Findings illustrate the use of language to enhance patient safety as well as opportunities for enhancing patient safety goals such as medication reconciliation and fall prevention. In addition, the language used in this sample of hand-offs displays the shared understanding that nurses have about patients and patient care. Gaps in current hand-off communication practices and strategies for standardizing the hand-off process in accordance with new regulatory agency guidelines be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTalking about Patients: Nurses' Language Use During Hand-Offsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158409-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Talking about Patients: Nurses' Language Use During Hand-Offs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ford, Yvonne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Western Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Bronson School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1848 Plateau Dr SW, Wyoming, MI, 49519, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">616-538-9319</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yvonne.ford@wmich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Y. Ford, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hand-offs, the transition of responsibility for patient care from one provider to another, have recently come under scrutiny by regulatory agencies and researchers. Nurses hand-off the care of patients at the end of every shift, as well as when patients move from one healthcare setting to another. Research to date on hand-offs has focused on the functions that hand-offs serve for the nurses who participate in them, to the exclusion of the language used to transmit information. Genre theory, a linguistic theory, illustrates the relationships between language and the context within which it is used. This descriptive study of forty-three end-of-shift hand-offs examined the use of language by nurses during hand-offs using the linguistic approaches of genre analysis and corpus analysis. Genre analysis, a form of discourse analysis based on genre theory, was used to identify the move structure of the hand-offs. Four moves were consistently used by nurses to transmit patient information: Introducing the Patient; Summarizing the Shift's Events; Looking Ahead; and Wrapping Up. Corpus analysis, an electronic method of analyzing large bodies of text, was then used to identify the patterns of the language used by nurses in hand-offs, including the use of linguistic features such as parts of speech, grammatical structures, and phrases within the hand-offs. This description of the text of nursing hand-offs adds to what is already known about hand-offs with specific information about the language patterns that nurses use to relay information about patients' conditions and care. Findings illustrate the use of language to enhance patient safety as well as opportunities for enhancing patient safety goals such as medication reconciliation and fall prevention. In addition, the language used in this sample of hand-offs displays the shared understanding that nurses have about patients and patient care. Gaps in current hand-off communication practices and strategies for standardizing the hand-off process in accordance with new regulatory agency guidelines be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:01:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:01:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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