Comparing rural urban older African American women with respect to demographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, stress, menopausal knowledge, self care, and health status

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158410
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing rural urban older African American women with respect to demographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, stress, menopausal knowledge, self care, and health status
Abstract:
Comparing rural urban older African American women with respect to demographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, stress, menopausal knowledge, self care, and health status
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Gary, Faye, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-5240
Co-Authors:F. Gary, C. Harmon, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; H. Yarandi, Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;
Over the past two centuries, the health and mental health status of rural African American women has revealed disparities and poorer health when data are compared with their Caucasian counterparts. The social determinants of health can be influenced by numerous factors, and until recently, there was limited scientific data that explained the predictors of a favorable health status among rural and urban African American older women. The dynamics that place rural and urban African American older women at risk for poor health are not linear, but are much like a colorful tapestry of complexities that reflect ethnicity, culture, geography, health beliefs and practices, access to health care, environmental factors, health behaviors, health and a variety of other factors. This research will compare the self reported health status of rural (n=206) and urban (200) African American older women with regard to selected variables such as personal demographics, depression scores, stress, menopausal health knowledge, and self care management techniques that are practiced. The women were invited to participate in face-to-face interviews in a variety of community settings within a 50-mile radius of a large state university in the rural south, and a five mile radius in the urban midwest. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to describe the demographic characteristics of the samples and to determine the potential differences in health status between the two groups. Nurses and other health providers should be more knowledgeable about the predictive factors that are related to the social determinants of health among African American women in rural and urban communities. Using the social determinants of health model, nurses and other health professionals can design programs that are relevant for this diverse and at-risk population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparing rural urban older African American women with respect to demographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, stress, menopausal knowledge, self care, and health statusen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158410-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparing rural urban older African American women with respect to demographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, stress, menopausal knowledge, self care, and health status</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gary, Faye, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-5240</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fgary@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">F. Gary, C. Harmon, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; H. Yarandi, Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over the past two centuries, the health and mental health status of rural African American women has revealed disparities and poorer health when data are compared with their Caucasian counterparts. The social determinants of health can be influenced by numerous factors, and until recently, there was limited scientific data that explained the predictors of a favorable health status among rural and urban African American older women. The dynamics that place rural and urban African American older women at risk for poor health are not linear, but are much like a colorful tapestry of complexities that reflect ethnicity, culture, geography, health beliefs and practices, access to health care, environmental factors, health behaviors, health and a variety of other factors. This research will compare the self reported health status of rural (n=206) and urban (200) African American older women with regard to selected variables such as personal demographics, depression scores, stress, menopausal health knowledge, and self care management techniques that are practiced. The women were invited to participate in face-to-face interviews in a variety of community settings within a 50-mile radius of a large state university in the rural south, and a five mile radius in the urban midwest. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to describe the demographic characteristics of the samples and to determine the potential differences in health status between the two groups. Nurses and other health providers should be more knowledgeable about the predictive factors that are related to the social determinants of health among African American women in rural and urban communities. Using the social determinants of health model, nurses and other health professionals can design programs that are relevant for this diverse and at-risk population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:01:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:01:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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