The Effect of Simulated Night Work on Subject's Risk for Post Shift Impaired Driving

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158413
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Simulated Night Work on Subject's Risk for Post Shift Impaired Driving
Abstract:
The Effect of Simulated Night Work on Subject's Risk for Post Shift Impaired Driving
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hobbs, Barbara, PhD, RN, NEA, BC
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Title:West River Nursing Department
Contact Address:1011 11th Street, Rapid City, SD, 57701, USA
Contact Telephone:(605) 394-5390
Co-Authors:B.B. Hobbs, College of Nursing , South Dakota State University , Rapid City, SD; C. Kerk, S. Kellogg, Engineering Department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD; D.E. Hobbs, Biomedical Department , Fort Meade Hospital , Fort Meade
Shift work and night work invert activity/rest patterns and affect millions of workers. Sleep loss is a major shift work-related health problem and leads to daytime sleepiness and accidents. Shift workers are the second highest group at risk for car accidents due to sleepiness; the effects of being awake for 24 hours are similar to being legally intoxicated. A recent study examining and comparing naps and exercise on subjects' alertness, sleepiness, activity, temperature and driving errors (impaired driving) during four 9-hour overnight shifts was completed. Seven healthy subjects (n=7) divided into two groups (n=3, n=4) completed the study. Each subject completed two 96-hour sessions. Each session (Wednesday 0800-Sunday 0800) included two 9-hour overnight shifts. Low fidelity video driving simulators were used to test subjects' driving errors during three 15-minute driving periods. Each subject completed three video driving periods (1, 2, and 3) between 0700-0800, (0700-0715, 0720-0735, and 0740-0755) following each over-night shift. Five minutes of data collection followed each driving period. For each driving period, driving errors were recorded and tallied. Driving errors were defined as 2-wheels crossing over-the-white line, 4 wheel errors and accidents. Two-wheel errors were considered low-risk errors; 4-wheels or any accident were established as high-risk driving errors. Odds ratios and risk ratios were calculated for each driving period and compared to each subject's daytime driving errors (baseline). The average number of driving errors per period compared to baseline revealed that subjects were nearly four times as likely to experience a high-risk error in periods 2 and 3. Period 2 was 20-35 minutes after ending work; period 3, 40-55 minutes. Risk of impaired driving, defined as any single incidence of either 4 wheels crossing a white line or having an accident was also calculated. There was a four times greater risk for a single incident of either 4-wheel errors or an accident for periods 2 and 3 compared to baseline. These findings suggest that night workers, who drive more than 15 minutes returning home or to their next destination, may be at greater risk for driving errors and accidents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Simulated Night Work on Subject's Risk for Post Shift Impaired Drivingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158413-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Simulated Night Work on Subject's Risk for Post Shift Impaired Driving</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hobbs, Barbara, PhD, RN, NEA, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">West River Nursing Department</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1011 11th Street, Rapid City, SD, 57701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(605) 394-5390</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Barbara.Hobbs@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.B. Hobbs, College of Nursing , South Dakota State University , Rapid City, SD; C. Kerk, S. Kellogg, Engineering Department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD; D.E. Hobbs, Biomedical Department , Fort Meade Hospital , Fort Meade</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Shift work and night work invert activity/rest patterns and affect millions of workers. Sleep loss is a major shift work-related health problem and leads to daytime sleepiness and accidents. Shift workers are the second highest group at risk for car accidents due to sleepiness; the effects of being awake for 24 hours are similar to being legally intoxicated. A recent study examining and comparing naps and exercise on subjects' alertness, sleepiness, activity, temperature and driving errors (impaired driving) during four 9-hour overnight shifts was completed. Seven healthy subjects (n=7) divided into two groups (n=3, n=4) completed the study. Each subject completed two 96-hour sessions. Each session (Wednesday 0800-Sunday 0800) included two 9-hour overnight shifts. Low fidelity video driving simulators were used to test subjects' driving errors during three 15-minute driving periods. Each subject completed three video driving periods (1, 2, and 3) between 0700-0800, (0700-0715, 0720-0735, and 0740-0755) following each over-night shift. Five minutes of data collection followed each driving period. For each driving period, driving errors were recorded and tallied. Driving errors were defined as 2-wheels crossing over-the-white line, 4 wheel errors and accidents. Two-wheel errors were considered low-risk errors; 4-wheels or any accident were established as high-risk driving errors. Odds ratios and risk ratios were calculated for each driving period and compared to each subject's daytime driving errors (baseline). The average number of driving errors per period compared to baseline revealed that subjects were nearly four times as likely to experience a high-risk error in periods 2 and 3. Period 2 was 20-35 minutes after ending work; period 3, 40-55 minutes. Risk of impaired driving, defined as any single incidence of either 4 wheels crossing a white line or having an accident was also calculated. There was a four times greater risk for a single incident of either 4-wheel errors or an accident for periods 2 and 3 compared to baseline. These findings suggest that night workers, who drive more than 15 minutes returning home or to their next destination, may be at greater risk for driving errors and accidents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:01:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:01:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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