2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158414
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perinatal Healthcare Professionals Perceptions of System Effectiveness
Abstract:
Perinatal Healthcare Professionals Perceptions of System Effectiveness
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Keating-Lefler, Rebecca, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing
Contact Address:420 South 11th St. #406, Omaha, NE, 68102, USA
Contact Telephone:402-453-6757
Co-Authors:R. Keating-Lefler, D. Brage-Hudson, C. Campbell-Grossman, Family and Health Systems, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Omaha, NE;
Problem: Births to single women and the number of women and children living in poverty are at an all time high. Access barriers to perinatal care exist for many low-income women. Uninsured and/or underinsured status keeps many women from receiving perinatal care and the care women do receive has been described as insufficient and/or ineffective by some women. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and describe perinatal healthcare professionals' perceptions of system effectiveness in meeting the needs of single, unpartnered, low-income mothers. Design: Qualitative using semi-structured interviews. Subjects: Twenty perinatal healthcare professionals including nurses, social workers, and midwives were interviewed. Methods: Participants were asked to describe their perceptions about needs and concerns of single-low-income mothers and the effectiveness of current practice. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The process of word and content interpretation was completed using a combination of qualitative data analysis techniques. Results: Four major themes emerged from the data. Themes include: (a) current portrait of motherhood; (b) barriers to healthcare system access and community resources; (c) insufficient parenting preparation, and (d) need for individualized assessments, interventions and supports within the system. Conclusions: Participants described a grim picture of the reality of the lives of poor, single women and their children and the failure of current practice to address and improve health and daily living issues. Identified themes will be useful in evaluating present practice and system effectiveness. Developing and implementing individualized interventions that improve parenting preparation and address family needs through the first year can follow. Barriers to healthcare access should be identified and eliminated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerinatal Healthcare Professionals Perceptions of System Effectivenessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158414-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perinatal Healthcare Professionals Perceptions of System Effectiveness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keating-Lefler, Rebecca, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">420 South 11th St. #406, Omaha, NE, 68102, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-453-6757</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rkeating@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Keating-Lefler, D. Brage-Hudson, C. Campbell-Grossman, Family and Health Systems, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Births to single women and the number of women and children living in poverty are at an all time high. Access barriers to perinatal care exist for many low-income women. Uninsured and/or underinsured status keeps many women from receiving perinatal care and the care women do receive has been described as insufficient and/or ineffective by some women. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and describe perinatal healthcare professionals' perceptions of system effectiveness in meeting the needs of single, unpartnered, low-income mothers. Design: Qualitative using semi-structured interviews. Subjects: Twenty perinatal healthcare professionals including nurses, social workers, and midwives were interviewed. Methods: Participants were asked to describe their perceptions about needs and concerns of single-low-income mothers and the effectiveness of current practice. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The process of word and content interpretation was completed using a combination of qualitative data analysis techniques. Results: Four major themes emerged from the data. Themes include: (a) current portrait of motherhood; (b) barriers to healthcare system access and community resources; (c) insufficient parenting preparation, and (d) need for individualized assessments, interventions and supports within the system. Conclusions: Participants described a grim picture of the reality of the lives of poor, single women and their children and the failure of current practice to address and improve health and daily living issues. Identified themes will be useful in evaluating present practice and system effectiveness. Developing and implementing individualized interventions that improve parenting preparation and address family needs through the first year can follow. Barriers to healthcare access should be identified and eliminated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:01:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:01:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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