2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158417
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pediatric Pain Management Practices in Rural Emergency Departments
Abstract:
Pediatric Pain Management Practices in Rural Emergency Departments
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kleiber, Charmaine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Contact Address:1819 Flanigan Ct, Iowa City, IA, 52246, USA
Contact Telephone:319 335 7057
Co-Authors:C. Kleiber, A. McCarthy, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; C. Jennissen, College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; T. Ansley, College of Liberal Arts, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines for managing acute pediatric pain, studies conducted in large centers show that pediatric pain management in Emergency Departments (EDs) continues to be inadequate. Clinicians who work in rural EDs may feel particularly uncomfortable with pediatric pain because of the infrequency with which children are encountered. In order to systematically developed methods for promoting evidence-based pain management practice in rural hospitals, information is needed about current practices and factors that may facilitate or impede knowledge uptake. The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) framework guided development of a survey measuring: current pain management practices; knowledge; attitudes; institutional culture; leadership; evaluation of practice; and barriers to implementing change. This poster presents the findings related to a) current pain management practices, b) knowledge about pediatric pain, and c) attitudes. The "current practice" scale includes questions about practices supported by randomized clinical trials (e.g., topical anesthetic or vapocoolant prior to needle stick, preparation of child prior to procedure, sucrose pacifier for neonates). Knowledge and attitude questions were adapted from the Dartmouth Hitchcock Pain Assessment Survey for Physicians and the Core Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Nursing. The survey was pilot tested with a group of ED nurses outside the state of Iowa and revised. The survey is open to all nurses (RNs and LPNs) who work in EDs in the state of Iowa. Of the 118 hospitals in Iowa, 82 are Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs). CAHs serve rural areas with 24 hour ED availability and a nursing coverage. The estimated population for this survey is 1000 individuals. Data collection will be complete in December 2008. Descriptive statistics, correlations (i.e., relationships among practice, knowledge and attitude scales) and group comparisons (i.e., CAHs vs. urban hospitals) will be presented in this analysis.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePediatric Pain Management Practices in Rural Emergency Departmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158417-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pediatric Pain Management Practices in Rural Emergency Departments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kleiber, Charmaine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1819 Flanigan Ct, Iowa City, IA, 52246, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319 335 7057</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">charmaine-kleiber@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Kleiber, A. McCarthy, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; C. Jennissen, College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; T. Ansley, College of Liberal Arts, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines for managing acute pediatric pain, studies conducted in large centers show that pediatric pain management in Emergency Departments (EDs) continues to be inadequate. Clinicians who work in rural EDs may feel particularly uncomfortable with pediatric pain because of the infrequency with which children are encountered. In order to systematically developed methods for promoting evidence-based pain management practice in rural hospitals, information is needed about current practices and factors that may facilitate or impede knowledge uptake. The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) framework guided development of a survey measuring: current pain management practices; knowledge; attitudes; institutional culture; leadership; evaluation of practice; and barriers to implementing change. This poster presents the findings related to a) current pain management practices, b) knowledge about pediatric pain, and c) attitudes. The &quot;current practice&quot; scale includes questions about practices supported by randomized clinical trials (e.g., topical anesthetic or vapocoolant prior to needle stick, preparation of child prior to procedure, sucrose pacifier for neonates). Knowledge and attitude questions were adapted from the Dartmouth Hitchcock Pain Assessment Survey for Physicians and the Core Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Nursing. The survey was pilot tested with a group of ED nurses outside the state of Iowa and revised. The survey is open to all nurses (RNs and LPNs) who work in EDs in the state of Iowa. Of the 118 hospitals in Iowa, 82 are Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs). CAHs serve rural areas with 24 hour ED availability and a nursing coverage. The estimated population for this survey is 1000 individuals. Data collection will be complete in December 2008. Descriptive statistics, correlations (i.e., relationships among practice, knowledge and attitude scales) and group comparisons (i.e., CAHs vs. urban hospitals) will be presented in this analysis.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:01:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:01:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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