Relationship Between Sleep and Outcome Variables for Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158419
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship Between Sleep and Outcome Variables for Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers
Abstract:
Relationship Between Sleep and Outcome Variables for Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:LaFramboise, Louise, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-6535
Co-Authors:L.M. LaFramboise, B.C. Yates, Y. Seo, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Objective: As many as 52% of Americans report inadequate sleep. Sleep disturbances are associated with medical and psychiatric illnesses, and decreased health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and compound the challenges faced by caregivers of heart failure (HF) patients. There is a dearth of research examining the relationship between sleep and outcome variables (burden, fatigue, depression, HRQOL, social support [SS], and coping) in HF spousal caregivers. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between sleep and outcome variables. Methods: A correlational design was used. Sleep was measured using both an Actiwatch-L and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Outcome variables were measured using the Caregiver Burden Scale, Piper Fatigue Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form 36, Social Support Measure, and Ways of Coping Checklist, all valid, reliable questionnaires. Results: The 19 participants were 79% Caucasian and 84% women with a mean age of 64 years. There was no significant relationship between the Actiwatch-L and PSQI sleep measures. The Actiwatch-L was significantly related only to emotional and informational SS. The PSQI was significantly related to all outcome measures: sleep quality and sleep latency were significantly related to caregiver burden; daytime dysfunction was significantly related to fatigue, depression, HRQOL, SS, and coping. Conclusions: The PSQI demonstrated a greater relationship to the outcome variables in this study than did the Actiwatch-L. Inadequate sleep is prevalent in caregivers of HF patients and does affect daily functioning. Spousal caregivers experience clinically meaningful symptoms that could be quickly and easily assessed at the same time patients are assessed, yet health care providers fail to detect and treat. Informal caregiving saves the health care system billions of dollars each year. Attention must be given to improving the sleep and health outcomes of caregivers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship Between Sleep and Outcome Variables for Heart Failure Spousal Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158419-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship Between Sleep and Outcome Variables for Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaFramboise, Louise, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-6535</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llaframb@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.M. LaFramboise, B.C. Yates, Y. Seo, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: As many as 52% of Americans report inadequate sleep. Sleep disturbances are associated with medical and psychiatric illnesses, and decreased health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and compound the challenges faced by caregivers of heart failure (HF) patients. There is a dearth of research examining the relationship between sleep and outcome variables (burden, fatigue, depression, HRQOL, social support [SS], and coping) in HF spousal caregivers. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between sleep and outcome variables. Methods: A correlational design was used. Sleep was measured using both an Actiwatch-L and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Outcome variables were measured using the Caregiver Burden Scale, Piper Fatigue Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form 36, Social Support Measure, and Ways of Coping Checklist, all valid, reliable questionnaires. Results: The 19 participants were 79% Caucasian and 84% women with a mean age of 64 years. There was no significant relationship between the Actiwatch-L and PSQI sleep measures. The Actiwatch-L was significantly related only to emotional and informational SS. The PSQI was significantly related to all outcome measures: sleep quality and sleep latency were significantly related to caregiver burden; daytime dysfunction was significantly related to fatigue, depression, HRQOL, SS, and coping. Conclusions: The PSQI demonstrated a greater relationship to the outcome variables in this study than did the Actiwatch-L. Inadequate sleep is prevalent in caregivers of HF patients and does affect daily functioning. Spousal caregivers experience clinically meaningful symptoms that could be quickly and easily assessed at the same time patients are assessed, yet health care providers fail to detect and treat. Informal caregiving saves the health care system billions of dollars each year. Attention must be given to improving the sleep and health outcomes of caregivers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:02:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:02:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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