2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158420
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Integrating Two Conceptual Approaches for Health Promotion
Abstract:
Integrating Two Conceptual Approaches for Health Promotion
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Lauver, Diane, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Contact Address:600 Highland Avenue, Room K6/350, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-5286
Co-Authors:D. Lauver, C. Worawong, , University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI;
Clinical problem: If people could improve their health behaviors, then they would be more likely to prevent chronic diseases and promote their health. Conceptual foundation: Although motivational interviewing (MI) has been a successful approach to promote health behaviors it has lacked a theoretical base. Self-determination theory (SDT) has guided research on health behaviors, been effective in a limited number of studies, and has conceptual similarities to motivational interviewing. One similarity is respecting the right of participants to chose when and how they will change their behaviors. Our purposes are to: 1) clarify MI and SDT, 2) discuss similarities between MI and SDT, and 3) offer examples from related nursing research Method: Two studies were conducted using one-group, pre-post-intervention designs. Participants were recruited from clinics and community sites. In Study 1, most were middle-aged, college-educated women in the Midwest. In Study 2, they were Thai pregnant women; most had only had education through 8th grade. Using pre-established guidelines, nurses delivered individualized interventions and used MI based on SDT to promote health behaviors. In Study 1 nurses promoted either PA or diet. In Study 2 they promoted healthy diet. Pre-post intervention data collection involved well-established health behavior measures. In both studies, post-intervention behavioral measures were obtained at 1 month follow-up interviews. Results: Descriptive findings revealed that participants welcomed these interventions (e.g., wished it were longer, would recommend to a friend). Pre-post comparisons with dependent t-tests revealed health behaviors improved (e.g., fruit - vegetable and calcium intake increased; physical activity increased). Conclusions: Integrating MI with concepts from SDT was associated with improved health behaviors in two culturally different samples. Individualized interventions based on MI and SDT promise to improve health behaviors and yet need to be tested with an experimental design and larger sample.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntegrating Two Conceptual Approaches for Health Promotionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158420-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Integrating Two Conceptual Approaches for Health Promotion</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lauver, Diane, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">600 Highland Avenue, Room K6/350, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-5286</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">drlauver@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D. Lauver, C. Worawong, , University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical problem: If people could improve their health behaviors, then they would be more likely to prevent chronic diseases and promote their health. Conceptual foundation: Although motivational interviewing (MI) has been a successful approach to promote health behaviors it has lacked a theoretical base. Self-determination theory (SDT) has guided research on health behaviors, been effective in a limited number of studies, and has conceptual similarities to motivational interviewing. One similarity is respecting the right of participants to chose when and how they will change their behaviors. Our purposes are to: 1) clarify MI and SDT, 2) discuss similarities between MI and SDT, and 3) offer examples from related nursing research Method: Two studies were conducted using one-group, pre-post-intervention designs. Participants were recruited from clinics and community sites. In Study 1, most were middle-aged, college-educated women in the Midwest. In Study 2, they were Thai pregnant women; most had only had education through 8th grade. Using pre-established guidelines, nurses delivered individualized interventions and used MI based on SDT to promote health behaviors. In Study 1 nurses promoted either PA or diet. In Study 2 they promoted healthy diet. Pre-post intervention data collection involved well-established health behavior measures. In both studies, post-intervention behavioral measures were obtained at 1 month follow-up interviews. Results: Descriptive findings revealed that participants welcomed these interventions (e.g., wished it were longer, would recommend to a friend). Pre-post comparisons with dependent t-tests revealed health behaviors improved (e.g., fruit - vegetable and calcium intake increased; physical activity increased). Conclusions: Integrating MI with concepts from SDT was associated with improved health behaviors in two culturally different samples. Individualized interventions based on MI and SDT promise to improve health behaviors and yet need to be tested with an experimental design and larger sample.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:02:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:02:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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